Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I am writing a test that depends on the results of an extension method but I don't want a future failure of that extension method to ever break this test. Mocking that result seemed the obvious choice but Moq doesn't seem to offer a way to override a static method (a requirement for an extension method). There is a similar idea with Moq.Protected and Moq.Stub, but they don't seem to offer anything for this scenario. Am I missing something or should I be going about this a different way?

Here is a trivial example that fails with the usual "Invalid expectation on a non-overridable member". This is a bad example of needing to mock an extension method, but it should do.

public class SomeType {
    int Id { get; set; }
}

var ListMock = new Mock<List<SomeType>>();
ListMock.Expect(l => l.FirstOrDefault(st => st.Id == 5))
        .Returns(new SomeType { Id = 5 });

As for any TypeMock junkies that might suggest I use Isolator instead: I appreciate the effort since it looks like TypeMock could do the job blindfolded and inebriated, but our budget isn't increasing any time soon.

share|improve this question
2  
A duplicate can be found here: stackoverflow.com/questions/2295960/…. – Oliver Oct 12 '12 at 13:04
3  
This question is an entire year older than that one. If there is duplication, it goes the other way. – patridge Oct 12 '12 at 16:55
up vote 42 down vote accepted

Extension methods are just static methods in disguise. Mocking frameworks like Moq or Rhinomocks can only create mock instances of objects, this means mocking static methods is not possible.

share|improve this answer
    
@Mendelt..Then how would one unit test a method that internally has an extension method ? what are the possible alternatives ? – Sai Avinash Jun 21 at 12:01

If you control the definition of the extension methods (i.e. they are not the LINQ built-in ones), there's another alternative, explained at http://blogs.clariusconsulting.net/kzu/making-extension-methods-amenable-to-mocking/ "Making extension methods amenable to mocking"]1

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't that entirely remove the usefulness of an extension method? It definitely does allow testing, but so would making a function that accepted the source object as a parameter in the first place, a pre-extension-method practice (saving {this}, as you do in your instantiated "extension" object). – patridge Feb 23 '09 at 16:40
    
That's all extension methods are in the end. "a function that accepts the source object as a parameter in the first place". Not sure what's wrong with that or the approach laid out in my post. – kzu May 16 '10 at 10:48
    
Since the implementation details can remain inside the static class defining the extension, it's a little better than defining a function or stand-alone class/method that does the same. All this method does is add a layer of indirection (the protected static factory property) that Moq (as a friend) can modify. Also I strongly prefer left-to-right coding, which extension methods (and this solution's "extension interface", preserve.) – Carl G Oct 24 '12 at 12:05
    
Your link is broken... – Terry Lewis Jan 12 '15 at 17:53
1  
Link broken again. Some of the link should be posted here so this doesn't happen again. – Danielson Oct 20 '15 at 17:29

I know this question hasn't been active for about a year but Microsoft released a framework to handle exactly this called Moles.

Here are a few tutorials as well:

  • DimeCasts.net
  • Nikolai Tillman's Tutorial

  • share|improve this answer

    I created a wrapper class for the extension methods that I needed to mock.

    public static class MyExtensions
    {
        public static string MyExtension<T>(this T obj)
        {
            return "Hello World!";
        }
    }
    
    public interface IExtensionMethodsWrapper
    {
        string MyExtension<T>(T myObj);
    }
    
    public class ExtensionMethodsWrapper : IExtensionMethodsWrapper
    {
        public string MyExtension<T>(T myObj)
        {
            return myObj.MyExtension();
        }
    }
    

    Then you can mock the wrapper methods in your tests and code with your IOC container.

    share|improve this answer
        
    @ranthonissen..really helpful..Thanks :) – Sai Avinash Jun 22 at 12:25

    If you can change the extension methods code then you can code it like this to be able to test:

    using System;
    using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
    using Moq;
    
    public static class MyExtensions
    {
        public static IMyImplementation Implementation = new MyImplementation();
    
        public static string MyMethod(this object obj)
        {
            return Implementation.MyMethod(obj);
        }
    }
    
    public interface IMyImplementation
    {
        string MyMethod(object obj);
    }
    
    public class MyImplementation : IMyImplementation
    {
        public string MyMethod(object obj)
        {
            return "Hello World!";
        }
    }
    

    So the extention methods are only a wrapper around the implementation interface.

    (You could use just the implementation class without extension methods which are sort of syntactic sugar.)

    And you can mock the implementation interface and set it as implementation for the extensions class.

    public class MyClassUsingExtensions
    {
        public string ReturnStringForObject(object obj)
        {
            return obj.MyMethod();
        }
    }
    
    [TestClass]
    public class MyTests
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void MyTest()
        {
            // Given:
            //-------
            var mockMyImplementation = new Mock<IMyImplementation>();
    
            MyExtensions.Implementation = mockMyImplementation.Object;
    
            var myObject = new Object();
            var myClassUsingExtensions = new MyClassUsingExtensions();
    
            // When:
            //-------
            myClassUsingExtensions.ReturnStringForObject(myObject);
    
            //Then:
            //-------
            // This would fail because you cannot test for the extension method
            //mockMyImplementation.Verify(m => m.MyMethod());
    
            // This is success because you test for the mocked implementation interface
            mockMyImplementation.Verify(m => m.MyMethod(myObject));
        }
    }
    
    share|improve this answer

    For extension methods I normally use the following approach:

    public static class MyExtensions
    {
        public static Func<int,int, int> _doSumm = (x, y) => x + y;
    
        public static int Summ(this int x, int y)
        {
            return _doSumm(x, y);
        }
    }
    

    It allows to inject _doSumm fairly easy.

    share|improve this answer
    1  
    I just tried this but there's issues when passing the Parent mocked object that the extension is for when passing it into some other method which is in another assembly. In that case even with this technique the original extension is picked when the method is called in the other assembly, sort of a scoping issue. If I call directly in the Unit Test project it's fine though, but when you're testing other code which calls the extension method it just doesn't help. – Stephen York Jun 10 at 6:30
        
    @Stephen Not sure how to avoid this. I didn't ever had this kind of a scoping issue – dmigo Jun 10 at 10:12

    Your Answer

     
    discard

    By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

    Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.