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Android's security manual says that it is not safe to keep public key (used for Android market) just as a string and it should be hidden/encoded somehow. Can somebody please provide me with example how it can be done?

(I don't have separate server, so it can not be stored there)

Upd. Believe, this is quite common task related not to Android, but to other apps also.

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Are you sure you don't mean private key? There is very little an attacker can do with a public key. –  artbristol Apr 11 '11 at 13:32
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I am talking about public key from publisher's account. developer.android.com/guide/market/billing/…: To keep your public key safe from malicious users and hackers, do not embed your public key as an entire literal string. Instead, construct the string at runtime from pieces or use bit manipulation (for example, XOR with some other string) to hide the actual key. The key itself is not secret information, but you do not want to make it easy for a hacker or malicious user to replace the public key with another key. –  LA_ Apr 11 '11 at 16:09
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You could try asking this over at security.stackexchange.com. Some real experts on this over there... –  AviD Apr 17 '11 at 14:11
    
@LA_ did you find any solution –  Kishore Jul 23 '11 at 5:14
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That's correct, but you don't want to make it easy to replace the public key with another. –  Oleg Vaskevich Jul 2 '12 at 16:48

3 Answers 3

The relevant text from the page you linked to is this:

Important: To keep your public key safe from malicious users and hackers, do not embed your public key as an entire literal string. Instead, construct the string at runtime from pieces or use bit manipulation (for example, XOR with some other string) to hide the actual key. The key itself is not secret information, but you do not want to make it easy for a hacker or malicious user to replace the public key with another key.

That's pretty much all you need to know. There's no harm in people knowing your public key, the potential harm here is that someone replaces the public key in your program with their own in an effort to divert in-app purchases to their own account.

They're suggesting that you make it more difficult for that attacker by storing the key in separate pieces or XORing the key with some other string. Now, instead of just pasting their key over yours, they have to figure out what transforms you're doing to the string and make their own key fit that pattern. This is more work and might deter casual attackers, but won't prevent someone who is really determined.

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I don't really understand this. So instead of having String base64EncodedPublicKey = "thisIsMyKey";, is it safer to have String one="thisIs"; String two="MyKey"; String base64EncodedPublicKey = one+two;? –  Kalina Aug 27 '12 at 20:44
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@TheBeatlemaniac, something like that would be the minimum that they suggest. The attacker has his own public key, and he wants to find yours and replace it with his own. The more you split and manipulate your key, the more work the attacker has to do to replace it. As I said, though, none of this will stop a really determined attacker. –  Kevin Aug 28 '12 at 20:11

If you use the Keytool utility this is all done for you. You'll get a .keystore file on your local computer containing your private key(s) that is encrypted with a password; keep that file and the password secret and you're secure.

http://developer.android.com/guide/publishing/app-signing.html

In fact I believe the Android plugin for Eclipse even does all of this for you automatically.

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please check my first comment to the question - I am talking about public key. –  LA_ Apr 11 '11 at 16:09

On the public key, you can hash it and save it as a hash value. Better yet would be to salt the hash value with something you would know when you need to get the hashed value back. May be something like user name, or ESN. Look at android.telephony.TelephonyManager.getDeviceId()

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This isn't a solution, because he presumably needs to get the public key back at some point. A 1 way has won't do that. –  Falmarri Jun 12 '12 at 20:19

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