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I've been doing some work recently that analyzes relationships between various projects in source control. So far I've been using PowerShell and XPath through the Select-Xml cmdlet to process our csproj files, however this relies on my tenuous knowledge of how MSBuild uses the ProjectReference and Reference elements in the project files. It dawned on me that it would be much better if I could use MSBuild itself to resolve the references and then somehow inspect the results of the reference resolution process.

MSBuild experts: does this seem possible? Would this entail writing a custom targets file or something? Would I be forced into also building the projects as well since csproj files also import Microsoft.CSharp.targets?

Any insight would be nice. Thanks!

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You should look into Ms Build Community tasks. I found them really helpful. –  reggie Apr 11 '11 at 13:39

1 Answer 1

It is really quite easy. First reference these assemblies:

Microsoft.Build
Microsoft.Build.Engine
Microsoft.Build.Framework
Microsoft.Build.Utilities.v4.0

...and you can create some tooling around the MSBuild object model. I've got a custom MSBuild task that does this analysis right in the build, snippet below:

private bool CheckReferences(string projectFullPath)
{
    var project = new Project(projectFullPath);

    var items = project.GetItems("Reference");
    if (items == null)
        return true;

    foreach (var item in items)
    {
        if (item == null)
            continue;

        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(item.UnevaluatedInclude))
            continue;
        if (!item.HasMetadata("HintPath"))
            continue;

        string include = item.UnevaluatedInclude;
        string hintPath = item.GetMetadata("HintPath").UnevaluatedValue;

        if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(hintPath))
            if (hintPath.Contains(@"C:\") || hintPath.Contains("C:/"))
                LogWarning("Absolute path Reference in project {0}", projectFullPath);
    }

    return true;
}
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I'm actually doing this same thing simply by selecting the HintPath elements with XPath and doing similar checks, (and also System.IO.Path.IsPathRooted! ;) ) but I was hoping to find a solution that leveraged the same complex build logic that MSBuild uses when looking for a referenced assembly. From the looks of it, this is just analyzing the string contained in the HintPath element, right? –  bwerks May 6 '11 at 4:31
    
In this particular example, yes it is just checking the string. However, there are other kinds of validation that you can do in a task that can't be done easily with XPath. In code you get access not only to the unevaluated "Include" strings, but also to the values after they have been evaluated, and also to the entire project object model including any Imports. Just depends on how deep you need to go with your validation analysis. –  Brian Kretzler May 10 '11 at 5:08

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