Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am doing a question which asks to find the complexity of a nested for loop simplified using big O notation.

The question is:

for i <- 1 to n do
    for j <- 1 to n do
        for k <- 1 to (i+j) do
            a unit cost operation

I HAVE to prove the above using sum of series notation. I am kind of grasping the concept and have given this a crack. I just want to know whether I am doing it correctly or not.

Here is my answer:

**Assume sum(x=i, y) is the capital sigma notation with x as the lower bound and y as the upper bound.

=> sum(i=1, n) sum(j=1, n) sum(k=1, i+j) 1
=> sum(i=1, n) sum(j=1, n) (i+j)
=> sum(i = 1, n) n*i => n * sum (i = 1, n) i

subbing in rule for sum of arithmetic series gives: => n*n/2(n+1) => (n^3 + n^2) / 2

using big Oh rule -> max(f(x), g(x)): => max(n^3/2, n^2/2) => O(n^3)

I know the answer is correct but am not sure if my calculations prior to it are....

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

With a small correction:

  sum(i=1, n) sum(j=1, n) sum(k=1, i+j) 1
= sum(i=1, n) sum(j=1, n) (i+j)
= [ sum(i=1, n) sum(j=1, n) i ] + [ sum(i=1, n) sum(j=1, n) j ]
=   sum(i = 1, n) n*i           +   sum(i=1, n) n*(n+1)/2 
=   n * sum (i = 1, n) i        +   n * n * (n+1) / 2
=   n * n * (n+1) / 2           +   n * n * (n+1) / 2
=   n * n * (n+1)
=   n^3 + n^2
=   O( max(n^3, n^2) )           <--- as you correctly say
=   O(n^3)

Actually, it's Θ(n^3)


You could also use that i+j <= 2*n:

   sum(i=1, n) sum(j=1, n) sum(k=1, i+j) 1
=  sum(i=1, n) sum(j=1, n) (i+j)
<= sum(i=1, n) sum(j=1, n) 2*n
=  2*n * sum(i=1, n) sum(j=1, n) 1
=  2 * n^3
=  O(n^3)
share|improve this answer

Straightforwardly and formally (and empirically verified), with c --> a unit cost operation:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.