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I would like all my LI's to display on the same line, so I set each LI's display property to inline-block and set white-space = nowrap on the parent UL. I get the expected non-wrapping behaviour in FireFox and Chrome, but IE8 ignores the nowrap and displays the items on underneath the other.

Any idea what I am doing wrong?

Here is the HTML and CSS...

<html>
    <head>
        <style type="text/css"> 
            li
            {
                display: inline-block;
                list-style: none outside none;
                padding: 0px 10px 0px 10px;
                white-space: nowrap;
            }
            ul
            {
                white-space: nowrap;
            }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div style="float: left; width: 300px;">
            <ul>
                <li>
                    Menu 1
                </li>
                <li>
                    Menu Menu Menu 2
                </li>
                <li>
                    Menu 3
                </li>
                <li>
                    Menu 4
                </li>
            </ul>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>
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In my IE tester, they show one under the other L:P! Ok not in IE7! –  David Apr 11 '11 at 14:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want your elements to display one next to the other, try removing the -block of your display property.

Set it as follow :

display: inline;
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That does help, the items now display next to each other. But IE seems to struggle with padding in the list item (i.e. the first item has no left padding). I'll mark this answer as the correct one and see if I can solve the padding problems without resorting to inline-block. Thanks a mil :) –  willem Apr 11 '11 at 14:40
    
No problem, and for padding, have a look at some tutorials for padding/margin, block/inline element, it'll help you a lot. Also some elements render differently in other browsers, that's why @Diodeus told you to have a look at a CSS reset to ensure that all the browser render known elements the same. –  David Apr 11 '11 at 14:49

When using lists for menus:

  • Other than float:left (for horizontal menus) never put any styling on the LI
  • Put all styles on the A tag and use display:block
  • use a reset for your list:

    .menu ul, .menu li { list-style:none; padding:0; margin:0 }

Menu HTML should look like this:

<div class="menu">
    <ul>
        <li>
             <a href="...">Menu 1</a>
         </li>
    ...
    </ul>
</div>

See my tutorial, I love lists.

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Why shouldn't we add style to li tag? –  David Apr 11 '11 at 14:36
1  
Because there's no need to. The clickable item is the A tag, not the LI tag. The margin and padding should be part of the clickable element, not its container. This way there are no "dead spots" in your menu. Also inexperienced users start styling both the LI and the A and often create confusing conflicts. The KISS principle applies. –  Diodeus Apr 11 '11 at 14:44
    
David, look at this question as an example as to why to only style the A-tag. stackoverflow.com/questions/5622997/… –  Diodeus Apr 11 '11 at 14:46

a doctype should also help. otherwise you are working with IE in quirks mode. don't expect it to show your css correctly then.

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