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I need a way to stop a worker thread that does not contain a loop. The application starts the thread, the thread then creates a FileSystemWatcher object and a Timer object. Each of these has callback functions. What I have done so far is add a volatile bool member to the thread class, and use the timer to check this value. I'm hung up on how to exit the thread once this value is set.

    protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
    {
      try
      {
        Watcher NewWatcher = new Watcher(...);
        Thread WatcherThread = new Thread(NewWatcher.Watcher.Start);
        WatcherThread.Start();
      }
      catch (Exception Ex)
      {
          ...
      }
    }

public class Watcher
{
    private volatile bool _StopThread;

    public Watcher(string filePath)
    {
        this._FilePath = filePath;
        this._LastException = null;

        _StopThread = false;
        TimerCallback timerFunc = new TimerCallback(OnThreadTimer);
        _ThreadTimer = new Timer(timerFunc, null, 5000, 1000);
    }   

    public void Start()
    {
        this.CreateFileWatch();            
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        _StopThread = true;
    }

    private void CreateFileWatch()
    {
        try
        {
            this._FileWatcher = new FileSystemWatcher();
            this._FileWatcher.Path = Path.GetDirectoryName(FilePath);
            this._FileWatcher.Filter = Path.GetFileName(FilePath);
            this._FileWatcher.IncludeSubdirectories = false;
            this._FileWatcher.NotifyFilter = NotifyFilters.LastWrite;
            this._FileWatcher.Changed += new FileSystemEventHandler(OnFileChanged);

            ...

            this._FileWatcher.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            ...
        }
    }

    private void OnThreadTimer(object source)
    {
        if (_StopThread)
        {
            _ThreadTimer.Dispose();
            _FileWatcher.Dispose();
            // Exit Thread Here (?)
        }
    }

    ...
}

So I can dispose the the Timer / FileWatcher when the thread is told to stop - but how do I actual exit/stop the thread?

share|improve this question
    
I think that if you use a BackgrundWorker, you can set to true a variable contained in the form you're running the thread in –  Marco Apr 11 '11 at 14:53
    
I would like to avoid rewriting the class if possible. I have seen that as an answer in a few other question - I guess if that is the correct way of doing it I might have to. –  cschear Apr 11 '11 at 14:57
1  
From the looks of it, the question is specifically about cancellation flow with I/O concurrency. Is that so? –  GregC Apr 11 '11 at 15:06
    
Yes. I need to stop the thread after between actions taken when a file is changed. –  cschear Apr 11 '11 at 16:38
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Rather than a Boolean flag, I would suggest using a ManualResetEvent. The thread starts the FileSystemWatcher, then waits on an event. When Stop is called, it sets the event:

private ManualResetEvent ThreadExitEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);

public void Start()
{
    // set up the watcher
    this.CreateFileWatch();

    // then wait for the exit event ...
    ThreadExitEvent.WaitOne();

    // Now tear down the watcher and exit.
    // ...
}

public void Stop()
{
    ThreadExitEvent.Set();
}

This prevents you from having to use a timer, and you'll still get all your notifications.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - going to give that a shot right now. –  cschear Apr 11 '11 at 16:39
    
@Chris: Others have noted that there's no need to use a thread if all you need is the FileSystemWatcher. You can just create the watcher on the main thread and it will continue to notify until you tell it to stop. –  Jim Mischel Apr 11 '11 at 16:43
    
I am modifying some existing code, and am trying to make it work as close to the original design as possible. Ultimately I just would like the thread to stop between file change logic - not in the middle of one. At this point I do not want to redesign the logic of the service. –  cschear Apr 11 '11 at 17:26
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The thread will exit when the Start method exits. By the time you get to the Timer, it's already gone.

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Its weird because I though the same thing - but when the service is installed the methods still fire. Its looking like this is not the correct way of doing what I need anyway. –  cschear Apr 11 '11 at 14:59
2  
@Chris: you don't need to create a thread to run a FileSystemWatcher. You just need to keep it alive by keeping a reference to it somewhere. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 11 '11 at 15:03
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There are generally speaking 2 ways to do this

  • Use Thread.Abort() to abort the thread. This is largely considered a very dangerous operation as it will effectively throw an exception and use this to exit the thread. This can very easily lead to leaked resources or forever locked mutexes if the code is not adequetely prepared. I would avoid this approach
  • Check the _StopThread value at prescribed places and either return out of the method or throw an exception to get back to the thread start and gracefully exit the thread from there. This is the approach favored by the TPL code base (cancellation tokens)
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Looks like an opinion only. I would like to see some code :) –  GregC Apr 11 '11 at 15:09
1  
@GregC, which part do you consider an opinion? –  JaredPar Apr 11 '11 at 15:14
    
CancellationTokens and similar work flows do not apply to network and other i/o operations. Please see my answer, borrowed from MSDN. –  GregC Apr 11 '11 at 15:32
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In your case, the thread does not do anything as it exits right away. You could create the Watcher object in your main thread as well.

The Watcher continues to exist even after the creating thread terminated. To get rid of it, use Dispose.

Or, more specifically, why do you even want to use a thread? To handle the events on a different thread from the main thread? In that case, create a new thread in the Watcher event handler.

This again has to be done carefully to avoid excessive thread creation. A typical solution is to use a thread pool / background workers.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Excellent observation. –  Jim Mischel Apr 11 '11 at 15:20
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Do not use Thread.Start !

Use TPL, Rx, BackgroundWorker or something higher level.

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http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd997423.aspx

You cannot cancel a FromAsync task, because the underlying .NET Framework APIs currently do not support in-progress cancellation of file or network I/O. You can add cancellation functionality to a method that encapsulates a FromAsync call, but you can only respond to the cancellation before FromAsync is called or after it completed (for example, in a continuation task).

share|improve this answer
    
I am questioning the need to clean up programmatically. All background threads exit by themselves when app exits. –  GregC Apr 11 '11 at 15:33
    
When starting an i/o operation on an i/o completion port, you can set a timeout. When operation times out, you could check to see if thread is exiting in a while-loop fashion. –  GregC Apr 11 '11 at 16:05
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