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I'm coding a worksheet app for a printer company. I'm getting flood of forms. For every single input field I have to check the _POST variables are set and if it is than echo back the value. (In case of some error, for example after a validation error the user shouldn't retype the whole form)

A sample code:

if(isset($_POST['time'])&&!empty($_POST['time'])){echo $_POST['time'];}

I had to implement this about a hundred times. So I tried to figure out some kind of function to make this simple and readable.

Something like this:

function if_post_echo($key, $default = "") {
    if(isset($_POST[$key])&&!empty($_POST[$key])){
    echo $_POST[$key];   
    }else{
    echo $default;   
    }
}

But this wont work. I have tried the way when I pass in the $_POST for the $key variable. Like this:

if_post_echo($_POST['time'])

function if_request_echo($key, $default = "") {
        if(isset($key)&&!empty($key)){
        echo $key;   
        }else{
        echo $default;   
        }
    }

And I tried this one also:

function if_request_echo($key, $default = null) {
    return isset($_REQUEST[$key])&&!empty($_REQUEST[$key]) ? $_REQUEST[$key] : $default;
}

Without any resonable outcome.

The question: How can I forge a function that looks for the necessery $_POST variable and returns it or if its unset than returns an empty string. And is there a way to do this for $_GET and $_REQUEST too? (Or simply duplicate?)

Humbly yours, Előd

share|improve this question
    
Most of the time, you should avoid $_REQUEST, security matter. Go with $_GET and $_POST depending on the sent data. –  David Apr 11 '11 at 15:07
    
Thank you for your comments! @David: I know about the $_REQUEST issue, but this time we are behind protection, the app un availabe from the net. @netcoder: I cant remember why I set this up like this, but I know I used to try the !empty alone without the isset and that dropped some problems. –  Kael Apr 11 '11 at 15:13
    
@David how is $_REQUEST any less secure than $_GET or $_POST? They can all be modified by the user to produce values your application might not expect. As can $_COOKIE for that matter, which $_REQUEST also gets its value from. –  Treffynnon Apr 11 '11 at 15:18
2  
@David although one indeed should avoid $_REQUEST, there is absolutely nothing security related. –  Your Common Sense Apr 11 '11 at 15:19
1  
Well, it's not actually a security but essential difference between POST and GET methods. –  Your Common Sense Apr 11 '11 at 15:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your PHP testing function:

<?php
function test_req($key, $default = '') {
    if(isset($_REQUEST[$key]) and
       !empty($_REQUEST[$key])) {
        return $_REQUEST[$key];
    } else {
        return $default;
    }
}
?>

Then in your form HTML:

<input name="my_field" value="<?php echo htmlentities(test_req('my_field')); ?>" />

$_REQUEST (linked) is a PHP super global that contains both POST ($_POST) and GET ($_GET) request parameters.

If you only want to capture POST request parameters then it would be:

<?php
function test_req($key, $default = '') {
    if(isset($_POST[$key]) and
       !empty($_POST[$key])) {
        return $_POST[$key];
    } else {
        return $default;
    }
}
?>

For example.

share|improve this answer

This should work:

function if_post_echo($key, $default = ''){
    if(isset($_POST[$key]) AND !empty($_POST[$key]){
        echo $_POST[$key];
    }

    echo $default;
}

If you're having problems I recommend that you try var_dump($_POST) or print_r($_POST) to see if everything has been properly posted.

share|improve this answer

If you have a large amount of fields, I would propose that you also use an array of defaults:

$defaults = array(
    "time" => "default",
    "name" => "enter name here",
    "text..." => "...",
);

$fields = array_filter($_POST) + $defaults;

$fields will then contain a list of form values with either the POST data or a preset default. No isset, see?

array_filter man page particularly: If no callback is supplied, all entries of input equal to FALSE will be removed. Goes some way to explaining the working behind this solution.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the simplicity of this approach. –  Treffynnon Apr 11 '11 at 15:21
    
Thanks; also for adding the link! (It indeed works similar to empty() in this case.) –  mario Apr 11 '11 at 15:24

Just to note, this is redundant:

isset($_POST[$key]) && !empty($_POST[$key])

An unset variable is going to always be "empty", so isset() is implied in your empty() call.

For your logic you can achieve the same result with just:

!empty($_POST[$key])
share|improve this answer
function requireArray( $array, $required ) {
    foreach( $required as $k=>$v ) {
        if ( !isset($array[$k]) || empty($array[$k]) )
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}
#call like this:
requireArray($_POST, array('time', 'username', 'foo'));

If you want to know specifically:

function missingFrom( $array, $required ) {
    $r = array();
    foreach( $required as $k ) {
        if ( !isset($array[$k]) || empty($array[$k]) )
            $r[] = $k;
    }
    return $r;
}

Called like previous function.

share|improve this answer

Your method seems to work fine here:

function if_post_echo($key, $default = "") {
    if(isset($_POST[$key])&&!empty($_POST[$key])){
        echo $_POST[$key];   
    }else{
        echo $default;   
    }
}

I made a simple input with the name test and the form method is POST and using echo if_post_echo('test');.

It posted on the page what was in the text box.

share|improve this answer

Your first function works perfectly to me.

Why do you think it doesn't work?

However, a better variant would be

function _post($key, $default = "") {
    if(isset($_POST[$key])){
        return $_POST[$key];
    }else{
        return $default;
    }
}

To use it :

echo $_post($key); // You could define the message as a second parameter.
share|improve this answer
    
I'm really messed up. With exactly this code you used i paste this: value="<?php _post(time); ?>" and returns nothing. –  Kael Apr 11 '11 at 15:30
    
value="<?php echo htmlentities(_post(time)); ?> –  Treffynnon Apr 11 '11 at 15:31
    
you should echo it's output. –  Your Common Sense Apr 11 '11 at 15:32
    
This does not check if the variable is empty, which is fine if $default is always an empty string. If not then it doesn't function as asked for. –  Treffynnon Apr 11 '11 at 15:37

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