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I have a simple table in a PostgreSQL 9.0.3 database that holds data polled from a wind turbine controller. Each row represents the value of a particular sensor at a particular time. Currently the table has around 90M rows:

wtdata=> \d integer_data
          Table "public.integer_data"
 Column |           Type           | Modifiers 
--------+--------------------------+-----------
 date   | timestamp with time zone | not null
 name   | character varying(64)    | not null
 value  | integer                  | not null
Indexes:
    "integer_data_pkey" PRIMARY KEY, btree (date, name)
    "integer_data_date_idx" btree (date)
    "integer_data_name_idx" btree (name)

One query that I need is to find the last time that a variable was updated:

select max(date) from integer_data where name = '<name of variable>';

This query works fine when searching for a variable that exists in the table:

wtdata=> select max(date) from integer_data where name = 'STATUS_OF_OUTPUTS_UINT16';
          max           
------------------------
 2011-04-11 02:01:40-05
(1 row)

However, if I try and search for a variable that doesn't exist in the table, the query hangs (or takes longer than I have patience for):

select max(date) from integer_data where name = 'Message';

I've let the query run for hours and sometimes days with no end in sight. There are no rows in the table with name = 'Message':

wtdata=> select count(*) from integer_data where name = 'Message';
 count 
-------
     0
(1 row)

I don't understand why one query is fast and the other takes forever. Is the query somehow being forced to scan the entire table for some reason?

wtdata=> explain select max(date) from integer_data where name = 'Message';
                                                       QUERY PLAN                                                       
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Result  (cost=13.67..13.68 rows=1 width=0)
   InitPlan 1 (returns $0)
     ->  Limit  (cost=0.00..13.67 rows=1 width=8)
           ->  Index Scan Backward using integer_data_pkey on integer_data  (cost=0.00..6362849.53 rows=465452 width=8)
                 Index Cond: ((date IS NOT NULL) AND ((name)::text = 'Message'::text))
(5 rows)

Here's the query plan for a fast query:

wtdata=> explain select max(date) from integer_data where name = 'STATUS_OF_OUTPUTS_UINT16';
                                                        QUERY PLAN                                                        
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Result  (cost=4.64..4.65 rows=1 width=0)
   InitPlan 1 (returns $0)
     ->  Limit  (cost=0.00..4.64 rows=1 width=8)
           ->  Index Scan Backward using integer_data_pkey on integer_data  (cost=0.00..16988170.38 rows=3659570 width=8)
                 Index Cond: ((date IS NOT NULL) AND ((name)::text = 'STATUS_OF_OUTPUTS_UINT16'::text))
(5 rows)
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Have you ran analyze on this table? –  Bob Apr 11 '11 at 16:15
    
Yes, I've run analyze manually, plus autovacuum is running. –  jcollie Apr 11 '11 at 16:17
    
Any chance you can share your database in a compressed file? Looks like a good learning opportunity? –  Bob Apr 11 '11 at 16:22
1  
You'll get a bit more info if you use EXPLAIN ANALYZE instead of EXPLAIN. EXPLAIN just returns the query plan. EXPLAIN ANALYZE actually runs the query, and then returns the query plan with real-world timing info. –  Frank Farmer Apr 11 '11 at 17:13
1  
Does this behave any differently?: SELECT date FROM from integer_data where name = 'Message' ORDER BY DATE DESC LIMIT 1; –  Frank Farmer Apr 11 '11 at 17:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Change the primary key to (name,date).

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