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if() {

}else {
    if (IsAlternateRow=='true')
        IsAlternateRow = 'false';
    else
        IsAlternateRow = 'true';
}

Can I place an if and else statement inside of another else statement?

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4  
Try to post this question to the code review website (codereview.stackexchange.com). It's more suited there. –  Hosam Aly Apr 11 '11 at 15:17
    
yes, technically speaking you can do this, but you will want to avoid it whenever possible to keep your code 'clean' and readable –  Timothy Groote Apr 11 '11 at 15:17
    
Sidenote: if (IsAlternateRow == 'true') will certainly be false, as == evaluates object reference equality. If you wanted string comparison, use .equals(). –  birryree Apr 11 '11 at 15:18
1  
Well it's not longer Java but JavaScript,... which makes for a lot of confusion :D –  Skurmedel Apr 11 '11 at 15:23
1  
Yeah, this question has significantly changed since it was created. First it was a "how can I change this code to make it better" and was tagged java. Now it's a "can I nest if/else statements" tagged javascript ... –  Rob Hruska Apr 11 '11 at 15:24

9 Answers 9

up vote 5 down vote accepted

try

IsAlternateRow = !IsAlternateRow;

(updated to show what this would look like in your code)

var IsAlternateRow = false;

if(/* -- insert equation here -- */) 
{
 // do something
} 
 else 
{
    IsAlternateRow = !IsAlternateRow;
}
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Can you explain me this... –  theJava Apr 11 '11 at 15:17
    
it's a simple way to invert a boolean value. IsAlternateRow (interpret as false) ` = !IsAlternateRow `(interpret as !false, or true) This works from false to true and from true to false. –  Timothy Groote Apr 11 '11 at 15:20
    
@theJava: IsAlternateRow will === the opposite of what IsAlternateRow currently equals, in terms of Booleans. –  Shaz Apr 11 '11 at 15:20
    
I am just confused... can you place this code in my statement and show me... should i declare isAlternateRow somewhere –  theJava Apr 11 '11 at 15:22
2  
@theJava: jsfiddle.net/Fwdyh –  Shaz Apr 11 '11 at 15:24

Note: the question got re-tagged as JavaScript after this answer was posted (it was originally about Java, so this answer is about Java).

In general, it is fine to place an if and an else inside an else clause.

There are, however, several issues with your code. IsAlternateRow=='true' isn't syntactically valid.

  • If it's a string comparison, you should use double quotes and .equals();
  • If it's a boolean comparison, you're better off simply doing IsAlternateRow = !IsAlternateRow instead of the entire nested if.
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Actually, it's syntactically fine. Logically it's a mess... –  Chris Thompson Apr 11 '11 at 15:18
3  
@Chris Nope. 'true' and 'false' are not valid character constants. –  Isaac Truett Apr 11 '11 at 15:20
    
Ah, you're right. I missed the single quotes –  Chris Thompson Apr 11 '11 at 15:25
    
@Isaac Truett - I upvoted your comment, but the question has changed tags from java to javascript, so it no longer applies. We all got pwned by late editing :( –  Rob Hruska Apr 11 '11 at 15:26
    
@Issac Why aren't 'true' and 'false' valid character constants. –  Ash Burlaczenko Apr 11 '11 at 15:26

return (IsAlternateRow.equals('true')) ? 'false' : 'true'

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Yes, placing an if inside an else is perfectly acceptable practice but in most cases use of else if is clearer and cleaner. E.g.

if (test) {
   // Do something
} else if (otherTest) {
   // Do something else
} else {
   // Do a third thing
}

infact this is short-hand for

if (test) {
   // Do something
} else {
     if (otherTest) {
         // Do something else
     } else {
         // Do a third thing
     }
}

and the two should compile to almost identical programs in most situations.

Your code example is not very clear and will not compile correctly, clearer sample code may help us to help you out.

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In general, I'd say that to answer questions like this, you should ask yourself,

Is this easy to read?

Shallow-nested if/else statements aren't terrible, but once you start nesting ad nauseum, you should probably refactor.

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This is fine, but there are easier ways to do what you are doing:

IsAlternateRow = !IsAlternateRow
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Yes you can. If you want to evaluate the same object/variable several time you could use a switch statement but in many case staggered if statement will do the job just as well.

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To answer your question, yes, you can infinitely nest if/else statements. The code you supplied will compile no problem. Although given that you're talking about Java, I imagine unless that's pseudo code, it isn't going to provide the desired result.

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Correct way to do it:

if() {

} else if (IsAlternateRow=='true') {
    IsAlternateRow = 'false';
}
 else
{
    IsAlternateRow = 'true';
}
share|improve this answer
    
using a string for boolean comparisons like this isn't the best way though. –  Timothy Groote Apr 12 '11 at 10:21

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