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In my code I need to sort a collection either by Price or by Rating.TotalGrade and as you can see both LINQ querys are almost the same statement with only a minor difference.

I was thinking about using a LINQ predicate instead but as you can see the the orderby is the main difference and I found no sample using orderby in a query. Is it possible or are there other ways to shorten my code, Maybe there will be even more conditions in the future.

if (CurrentDisplayMode == CRSChartRankingGraphDisplayMode.Position)
{
    this.collectionCompleteSorted = new List<Result>(from co in collection
                                    where co.IsVirtual == false
                                    orderby co.Price, co.CurrentRanking
                                    select co);
}
else if (CurrentDisplayMode == CRSChartRankingGraphDisplayMode.Grade)
{
    this.collectionCompleteSorted = new List<Result>(from co in collection
                                    where co.IsVirtual == false
                                    orderby co.Rating.TotalGrade, co.CurrentRanking
                                    select co);
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can easily make use of deffered nature of LINQ and ability to easily compose queries.

Probably using code like this:

        var baseQuery = from co in collection where !co.IsVirtual select co; // base of query
        IOrderedEnumerable<Result> orderedQuery; // result of first ordering, must be of this type, so we are able to call ThenBy

        switch(CurrentDisplayMode) // use enum here
        { // primary ordering based on enum
            case CRSChartRankingGraphDisplayMode.Position: orderedQuery = baseQuery.OrderBy(co => co.Price);
                break;
            case CRSChartRankingGraphDisplayMode.Grade: orderedQuery = baseQuery.OrderBy(co => co.TotalGrade);
                break;
        }

        this.collectionCompleteSorted = orderedQuery.ThenBy(co => co.CurrentRanking).ToList(); // secondary ordering and conversion to list

Its easy to understand and avoids converting to list until the very end.

share|improve this answer
    
Works perfectly! Thanks! Is converting to list early a bad thing? –  TalkingCode Apr 12 '11 at 9:07
    
Its not bad. But you cant use secondary ordering using ThenBy if you convert to List too early. Also, if you are using Linq to SQL or Entities, then this will result in a query that is completly transformed into SQL. If you converted to list early, the ordering would be done on client. –  Euphoric Apr 12 '11 at 9:46

If just your order by is different, than return your result into this.collectionCompleteSorted, and then do this.collectionCompleteSorted.OrderBy() when you enumerate through the data.

this.collectionCompleteSorted = new List<Result>(from co in collection 
                                                             where co.IsVirtual == false                                                                  
                                                             select co);

foreach (var obj in this.collectionCompleteSorted.OrderBy(c => c.Price).ToList())
{
    // do something
}

And remove the order by remove your current linq query.

If the query is just being executed once, than you can leave off the .ToList() from the linq query in the example above. When ToList is called, this causes the query to be executed immediately, where if the OrderBy is implemented in a later call to the collection and a ToList is also, than the query would actually be executed on the database server with an order by statement, offloading the ordering from the code to the database. See http://blogs.msdn.com/b/charlie/archive/2007/12/09/deferred-execution.aspx

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-1 Not answering the question at all –  Euphoric Apr 11 '11 at 16:06
    
@Euphoric What are you talking about? The question was about how to avoid not putting an order by in the linq query. I said to use the OrderBy method call on the collection, which strangely is the same exact thing you say to do below. –  mservidio Apr 11 '11 at 16:18
    
So, where is your variation of different ordering based on enum value? Along with secondary ordering. –  Euphoric Apr 11 '11 at 16:31

Why not just grab the values (less the sort), then (as it appears) use a case to order the results?

// build your collection first
var items = from co in collection
            where !co.IsVirtual
            select co;

// go through your sort selectors
select (CurrentDisplayMode)
{
  case CRSChartRankingGraphDisplayMode.Position:
    this.collectionCompleteSorted = items.OrderBy(i => i.Price).ThenBy(j => j.CurrentRanking).ToList();
    break;
  case CRSChartRankingGraphDisplayMode.Grade:
    this.collectionCompleteSorted = items.OrderBy(i => i.TotalGrade).ThenBy(j => j.CurrentRanking).ToList();
    break;
  ...
  //default: // maybe you want this, too
}
share|improve this answer
    
Almost there, i would recommend removing ToList from the baseQuery and perform a toList after the orderby. Also, you have to save the result of your OrderBy again in the member, that is: this.collectionCompleteSorted = this.collectionCompleteSorted.OrderBy(...).ThenBy(...) –  Polity Apr 11 '11 at 15:30
    
@Polity: Agreed. I fat-fingered a submit, still working out the code. ;-) Uno memento, por favor. ;p –  Brad Christie Apr 11 '11 at 15:31
var q = collection.Where(co => !co.IsVirtual);

if (CurrentDisplayMode == CRSChartRankingGraphDisplayMode.Position)
{
    q = q.OrderBy(co => co.Price).ThenBy(co => co.CurrentRanking);
}
else if (CurrentDisplayMode == CRSChartRankingGraphDisplayMode.Grade)
{
    q = q.OrderBy(co => co.Rating.TotalGrade).ThenBy(co => co.CurrentRanking);
}

this.collectionCompleteSorted = q.ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
You wont be able to call ThenBy on q, because q will be inferred ad IEnumerable<> and not IOrderedEnumerable<> –  Euphoric Apr 11 '11 at 15:46
    
@Euphoric, you are right, editing. –  Equiso Apr 11 '11 at 16:23

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