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I just want to ask about setprecision because I'm a bit confused.

here's the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
using namespace std;

int main()

{
  double rate = x;
  cout << fixed << setprecision(2) << rate;
}

where x = to following:

the left side of equation are the values of x.

1.105 = 1.10 should be 1.11

1.115 = 1.11 should be 1.12

1.125 = 1.12 should be 1.13

1.135 = 1.14 which is correct

1.145 = 1.15 also correct

but if x is:

2.115 = 2.12 which is correct

2.125 = 2.12 should be 2.13

so why in a certain value it's correct but sometimes it's wrong?

please enlighten me. thanks

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2  
It appears that fixed is using banker’s rounding. No idea whether this can be controlled. If you don’t find any other fix, you may need to round manually before formatting. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 11 '11 at 15:38
    
but setprecision is quite easy and time saving method because it can format all the outputs to two decimal places unlike manual formatting that i should format each. for example : i need to format the output for double rate,rate1,rate2,rate3,rate4 to two decimal places, i will just use setprecision once to format each of them. –  Marc Quebrar Tan Apr 11 '11 at 15:45

3 Answers 3

There is no reason to expect that any of the constants in your post can be represented exactly using the floating-point system. As a consequence, the exact halves that you have may no longer be exact halves once you store them in a double variable (regardless of how the iostreams are meant to round such numbers.)

The following code illustrates my point:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

using namespace std;

int main()

{
  double rate = 1.115;
  cout << fixed << setprecision(20) << rate;
}

Output:

1.11499999999999999112

I would recommend taking a look at the FAQ.

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Your answer doesn’t apply here. The OP’s issue is formatting induced rounding, not floating point arithmetic. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 11 '11 at 15:35
    
@Konrad Rudolph: formatting-induced rounding may be playing a part, but in my view it's not the main issue. –  NPE Apr 11 '11 at 15:48
    
@aix Except that 1.125 is exactly representable and also is "wrong" according to the OP. –  Mark B Apr 11 '11 at 15:50
    
@Mark B: I am not disputing that. What I am saying is that the OP's expectation that exact halves should be handled in a certain consistent manner is entirely misplaced. –  NPE Apr 11 '11 at 15:52
    
so what should i do as an alternative to setprecision? what i want is to format all the outputs to two decimal places, rounding them up if the 3rd number on the right of the decimal is 5 and up. for example: 1.105 will result in 1.11. should i use manual formating of each outputs? –  Marc Quebrar Tan Apr 11 '11 at 15:58

Why do you say that 1.105 should be 1.11? The C++ standard says nothing about it, but the default rounding mode on most of the usual machines (Intel, Sparc, etc.) is round to even, so 1.105 should be 1.10. In general, when the exact result is exactly between two representable values, the rule is to round to the one with an even least significant digit.

I also wonder where you're getting these values. On the usual machines, 1.105 can't be represented, so you have something slightly larger or slightly smaller.

And of course, the above comments apply for all of the other values you've cited.

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According to the OP 1.115 rounded to 1.11 which isn't even. –  Mark B Apr 11 '11 at 15:51
    
so what should i do as an alternative to setprecision? what i want is to format all the outputs to two decimal places, rounding them up if the 3rd number on the right of the decimal is 5 and up. for example: 1.105 will result in 1.11. should i use manual formating of each outputs? –  Marc Quebrar Tan Apr 11 '11 at 15:56
    
@Mark B. That's true. Most likely, my second point (that he never had 1.105 or 1.115 to begin with) is the true explination. But given his expectations, I thought that some remarks concerning round to even were in order. –  James Kanze Apr 11 '11 at 16:13
    
@Marc If you really need true bankers rounding, you'll probably have to find a decimal class, and do decimal arithmetic. On the systems I know, there are means of changing the rounding mode, but they still won't address the fact that you don't have 1.105 or 1.115 to begin with. –  James Kanze Apr 11 '11 at 16:14
    
@James But round to even is almost never a useful result, unless you work in finances (and then you wouldn’t be using floating point numbers). The usual rule for rounding is different. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 11 '11 at 16:15

Some of the numbers you're printing may not be representable as a floating point number and may actually be lower or higher than you think, directly affecting the rounding.

Since you're trying to format a floating point number to fixed point, have you considered actually USING a fixed point number (int/long scaled by say 1000 depending on your needs) that has its own insert operator defined? Then you'll always get accurate display and rounding without needing to rely on setprecision having any particular behavior (I couldn't find the relevant conversion section in the standard in a quick look).

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