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I am wondering does a list auto sort or something?

I have a

List<MyClass> myClass = new List<MyClass>()
myClass.Add(anotherClass);
myClass.Add(anotherClass2);
myClass.Add(anotherClass3);
myClass.Add(anotherClass4);

So all of them are MyClass object. They have something like this in it

public class MyClass
{
   public string type {get; set;}
   public string title {get; set;}
}


List<MyClass> first = myClass .where(x => x.type == "first").toList();
List<MyClass> second = myClass .where(x => x.type == "second").toList();

first.Sort((x, y) => string.Compare(x.title, y.title));
second.Sort((x, y) => string.Compare(x.Title, y.Title));
myClass.Clear();
myClass.AddRange(first);
myClass.AddRange(second);

So my real code sort of looks like this except "MyClass" is more complex and I have them in a foreach loop.

When I do first.Sort() and second.Sort() all my objects are in the correct order based on Title. When I clear and add "first" objects in first and then "second" object second it ruins my sorting.

I need the objects with type "first" to be sorted and before objects with types "second".

So say I have

A - first
B - second
C - first
D - second

it would be

A
C
B
D

I am getting

A - First
B - second
C - First
D - second
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, List<T> always stores its elements in the order you add them, unless you explicitly insert at particular positions.

You can ask it to sort, however, and provide a custom comparison to sort on - as you have done.

It looks like you're doing the right thing for what you describe you want. If I took all the men in the train carriage I'm sitting in, ordered them by age, and created one list from that, then did the same for the women, and finally used:

List<Person> allPeople = new List<Person>();
allPeople.AddRange(menSortedByAge);
allPeople.AddRange(womenSortedByAge);

I wouldn't get everyone sorted by age - I'd get all the men (sorted by age) then all the women (sorted by age). That's exactly what you should be seeing.

If that's not what you're seeing but it's what you want, you need to give us a short but complete program which demonstrates the problem. Tell us what you expected, and what you actually got.

If you just want to order by multiple criteria, it's easiest to just use LINQ:

var ordered = people.OrderBy(p => p.Gender)
                    .ThenBy(p => p.Age)
                    .ToList();

EDIT: Demonstration of your code (fixed for typos, and using an anonymous type for simplicity) working:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var myClass = new[]
        {
            new { Type="first", Title="A" },
            new { Type="second", Title="D" },
            new { Type="first", Title="C" },
            new { Type="second", Title="B" },
        }.ToList();
        var first = myClass.Where(x => x.Type == "first")
                           .ToList();
        var second = myClass.Where(x => x.Type == "second")
                            .ToList();

        first.Sort((x, y) => string.Compare(x.Title, y.Title));
        second.Sort((x, y) => string.Compare(x.Title, y.Title));
        myClass.Clear();
        myClass.AddRange(first);
        myClass.AddRange(second);
        foreach (var x in myClass)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(x);
        }
    }
}

Output:

{ Type = first, Title = A }
{ Type = first, Title = C }
{ Type = second, Title = B }
{ Type = second, Title = D }
share|improve this answer
    
@Jon Skeet - Well that's what I want(I think). I want to get all the men(in this case they always come first) sort them by age. So now I should have all the men in order by age. Now I want all the woman and order them by age. They should be ordered by age as well. Now I want to combine both lines(men first by age then women by age). –  chobo2 Apr 11 '11 at 16:49
    
Apparently that's not what he's seeing. He wants to see what you're saying at the end of your post. He wants A,C,B,D and he's getting something other than that. –  jcolebrand Apr 11 '11 at 16:49
1  
@chobo2: Right... it wasn't really clear what you were getting vs what you wanted to get. That's what should be happening, so the problem is probably in some of the code you haven't shown us. Please give a short but complete example which demonstrates the problem. –  Jon Skeet Apr 11 '11 at 16:51
1  
@chobo2: You wouldn't get that from the sample code you've posted, after you'd fixed up the errors. Please give a complete example. –  Jon Skeet Apr 11 '11 at 16:54
2  
@chobo2: I've edited my answer to give a short but complete program which demonstrates the code working. Run it for yourself. If you can come up with a similar program which does demonstrate the problem, we'll be able to fix it. –  Jon Skeet Apr 11 '11 at 16:59

Do you want your objects sorted by type, then by title? If so, LINQ to the rescue:

var sortedObjects = myClass.OrderBy(x => x.type).ThenBy(x => x.title);
share|improve this answer

When I do first.Sort() and second.Sort() all my objects are in the correct order based on Title. When I clear and add "first" objects in first and then "second" object second it ruins my sorting.

Why do you clear it? That sounds an awful lot like the following statement:

When I delete my files I cannot open them anymore. They seem to be missing from the disk.

share|improve this answer
    
Because I am reinserting them in the correct order I want them in. I grab all the "first" types" then all "second" types order all the "first types" order all the "second" types and then want to put them back into the original object in order. –  chobo2 Apr 11 '11 at 16:43
    
Yes but all you need is a filter and a sort on the first class. My point is that you're not telling it to resort, which is the thing you must do. –  jcolebrand Apr 11 '11 at 16:46
    
I am doing it in 2 different lists cuz I need to extract out the different types and then sort those types then put the types in a order. I am unsure how to do that all in one query. I don't understand why I have to tell it to resort it when I am putting into the original list 2 lists that are sorted. –  chobo2 Apr 11 '11 at 16:57
    
@chobo2 Because it doesn't maintain them in the sorted order when you readd them, afaik. It may be that reusing the original list is what's causing you issues, but what you're doing should give you what you wanted. –  jcolebrand Apr 11 '11 at 16:59

You could sort with something like this:

// this is what you call to sort.
myClass.Sort(MyClass.NameComparison);

// This would sit in your class which you referenced as "MyClass"
public static NameComparison<MyClass> NameComparison
{
    get
    {
        return delegate(MyClass c1, MyClass c2)
        {
            return c1.Name.CompareTo(c2.Name);
        };
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Why would this multi-line code be simpler than using the single-line lambda expression he's already using? –  Jon Skeet Apr 11 '11 at 17:00
    
It would only be useful if he didn't have linq available to him. I'm still working on a few projects with .net 2, and don't have advantage of the linq in those projects. –  mservidio Apr 11 '11 at 17:44

This can be easily replaced by

      myClass.OrderBy((m) => m.type).ThenBy((m) => m.title);

This eliminates the need for a second list and clearing etc.

share|improve this answer
    
well this would sort type by order alphabetically but my actual code the types that come first and what come second are not really in alphabetical. This of like Word documents come first Excel documents come next and finally Powerpoint ones come last. –  chobo2 Apr 11 '11 at 16:54
    
@chobo2: That sounds like you could do with a method to extract a "priority" from the document type (so Word would return 1, Excel would return 2, Powerpoint would return 3). Then you could use LINQ easily. –  Jon Skeet Apr 11 '11 at 17:00

How about a more object-oriented approach? Just implement IComparable<MyClass>, then when you call myList.Sort(); the list would appear to just magicly know how to sort itself.

public class MyClass : IComparable<MyClass>
{
    public string Type {get; set;}
    public string Title {get; set;}

    public int CompareTo(MyClass other) 
    {
        if (other == null) 
        {
           throw new ArgumentNullException("other");
        }
        else if(this.Type == other.Type)
        {
            return this.Title.CompareTo(other.Title);
        }
        else if(this.Type == "first")
        {
            return 1;
        }
        else
        {
            return -1;
        }
        // ...Or whatever you feel your sort needs to take into account.
    }
}

Also it keeps your nasty looking sorting logic hidden away from what you really want to do with the list; which is kind of the whole purpose of using LINQ in the first place.

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