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I have written the same join two different ways:

select
    one.first,
    two.second,
    three.third
from
    onetable one

    inner join twotable two
        on one.twokey = two.onekey

    inner join threetable three
        on two.twokey = three.twokey
        and one.onekey = three.onekey

where 1=1
    and one.firstnamefield in ('first name', 'second name', 'third name')
    and two.secondnamefield not in ('last name', 'sirname', 'family name')
    and three.thirdnamefield = ('nick name', 'pen name', 'handle')

and

select
    one.first,
    two.second,
    three.third
from
    onetable one

    inner join twotable two
        on one.twokey = two.onekey
        and one.firstnamefield in ('first name', 'second name', 'third name')
        and two.secondnamefield not in ('last name', 'sirname', 'family name')

    inner join threetable three
        on two.twokey = three.twokey
        and one.onekey = three.onekey
        and three.thirdnamefield = ('nick name', 'pen name', 'handle')

as you see, the WHERE portion from the first goes into the JOIN in the re-written query.

Is there any difference between the two?

Is one more desirable than the other?

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I'm pretty sure they do the same thing, the only real difference is the size of the query. I'm not 100% sure, though. –  iamandrus Apr 11 '11 at 17:36
2  
possible duplicate of INNER JOIN versus WHERE clause -- any difference? –  Daniel DiPaolo Apr 11 '11 at 17:36
    
@Daniel DiPaolo: I beg to differ - it is not even remotely a duplicate. I am not talking about explicit joins vs implicit joins, rather about differentiating between usage of columns that are actually PK & FK vs. columns in a WHERE clause. –  Raj More Apr 11 '11 at 20:41
    
but does whether or not those are key columns make any difference in the execution plan? I maintain that I think this is still a duplicate –  Daniel DiPaolo Apr 11 '11 at 20:43

3 Answers 3

As long as you are doing equi-joins (rather than outer joins), there is no functional difference between the two.

In general, I would prefer the former approach (though without the extraneous 1=1 clause). One of the benefits of the SQL 92 join syntax over other join syntaxes is that it allows you to separate the join conditions from the filter conditions. Your first statement implements that separation. Your second statement combines the join and filter conditions making it more difficult on first glance to identify how the tables are related to each other and how the data is being filtered.

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the 1=1 although extraneous, helps a lot with debugging –  Raj More Apr 11 '11 at 20:43
    
@Raj - Why does it help in debugging? Unless you're dynamically creating the SQL statement, which would be rather unusual, I suppose it does make it ever so slightly easier to comment out an entire line if you're refining the SQL statement (though not the last line which generally contains a semi-colon). –  Justin Cave Apr 11 '11 at 20:57
    
try commenting out any part of the WHERE clause in my style vs in the normal style - you will see what I mean. Plus this has negligible impact on performance and my code stays properly indented. –  Raj More Apr 12 '11 at 14:17
    
@Raj - OK, that's what I was referring to above. But you generally can't comment out the last line where there would generally be a semicolon. I guess it's never bothered me to use the /* ... */ syntax to comment out conditions. –  Justin Cave Apr 12 '11 at 14:21
    
I'm a big fan of keyboard shortcuts - I use the Control-K+C to comment and Control-K+U to uncomment all the time. So the 1=1 suits my coding style just fine. –  Raj More Apr 12 '11 at 14:32

There will be no difference in the results since you are using Inner Joins. However, the results could be quite different if these were Left Joins.

I tend to put conditions related to the join in the Join clause and conditions related to overall filtering (a thin distinction I'll grant you) in the Where clause. So, my inclination would have been the first form.

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  1. Regarding the result sets, there is no difference. You would notice a distinct result if you were using LEFT JOIN.
  2. Yes, the first one is more recommended. There is no difference for the database engine, but you should not mix filters (the "where" part) with joins.
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