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In the following examples:

public class RowData
{
    public object[] Values;
}

public class FieldData
{
    public object Value;
}

I am curious as how either protobuf-net or dotnet-protobufs would handle such classes. I am more familiar with protobuf-net, so what I actually have is:

[ProtoContract]
public class RowData
{
    [ProtoMember(1)]
    public object[] Values;
}
[ProtoContract]
public class FieldData
{
    [ProtoMember(1)]
    public object Value;
}

However I get an error saying "No suitable Default Object encoding found". Is there an easy way to treat these classes, that I am just not aware of?

To elaborate more on the use case:

This is a scaled down version of a data class used in remoting. So essentially it looks like this:

FieldData data = new FieldData();
data.Value = 8;

remoteObject.DoSomething(data);

Note: I've omitted the ISerializable implementation for simplicity, but it is as you'd expect.

share|improve this question
    
OK - there's a way it can be done; t'is hacky, but it should work... update on the way... –  Marc Gravell Feb 18 '09 at 22:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

(updated)

Right; figured it out... the main problem in my sample above was the value-getters; they were throwing exceptions. There were also some library glitches (now fixed).

However, the simplest approach is Nullable<T> pass-thru properties:

    [ProtoMember(1)]
    private int? ValueInt32
    {
        get { return Get<int>(); }
        set { Value = value; }
    }

etc, with:

    private T? Get<T>() where T : struct
    {
        return (Value != null && Value is T) ? (T?)Value : (T?)null;
    }

Both this and the *Specified approach have been tested, and now work fine.

share|improve this answer

Re protobuf-net, which I maintain:

The issue here isn't value-types (which it will often handle fine) - it is the open object usage, which means it simply doesn't know what data to expect, and thus how to encode/decode it.

At the moment, I can't think of an easy/clean way to handle that. It will handle a range of common value-type scenarios, lists, and any level of hierarchy based on contracts (data-contract, proto-contracts, or some xml-schemas), but it needs a clue.

Perhaps if you can clarify the use-case, I might be able to help more? For example, the above wouldn't work very with DataContractSerializer or XmlSerializer either...

Re dotnet-protobufs; I can't really comment, but I'm pretty sure it would be even less forgiving; it is intended to be used with classes generated from a .proto file, so object would simply never enter into the model (Jon: correct me if I am wrong).

If you do leave more info, could you kindly post a comment here? So I can find it easily... Alternatively, drop me a mail directly (see my SO profile).


edit - here's the hacky thing I had in mind - it isn't working at the moment, but I'll figure out why tomorrow (probably). Note that in theory the extra members could all be private - I'm just trying to make it easy while debugging. Note that this doesn't take any extra storage. Like I say, it doesn't work today, but it should - I'll find out why...

[ProtoContract]
public class FieldData
{
    public object Value {get;set;}

    [ProtoMember(1)]
    public int ValueInt32 {
        get { return (int)Value; } set { Value = value; } }
    public bool ValueInt32Specified {
        get { return Value != null && Value is int; } set { } }

    [ProtoMember(2)]
    public float ValueSingle {
        get { return (float)Value; } set { Value = value; } }
    public bool ValueSingleSpecified {
        get { return Value != null && Value is float; } set { } }

    // etc for expected types
}
share|improve this answer
    
I can't comment on DataContractSerializer, but the XmlSerializer has no problem with this. –  Greg Dean Feb 18 '09 at 21:25
    
I edited the question to provide a little more insight. –  Greg Dean Feb 18 '09 at 21:32
    
But it cheats ;-p It isn't truly contract-based when it does this... –  Marc Gravell Feb 18 '09 at 22:18
    
Yea - I was afraid of this –  Greg Dean Feb 18 '09 at 22:34
    
I was thinking more along the lines of inheritance. I'll post what I had in mind. –  Greg Dean Feb 18 '09 at 22:36

This is something like what I had in mind. Let me know what you think. Naturally I'd have to add a subclass for each value type I need to support. What do you think? Is there a better way, do you see any inefficiencies with this method?

[ProtoContract, Serializable]
[ProtoInclude(1, typeof(Int32FieldData))]
public abstract class FieldDataBase : ISerializable
{
	[ProtoIgnore]
	public abstract object Value { get; set;}
	protected FieldDataBase()
	{ }

	#region ISerializable Members
	protected FieldDataBase(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
	{
		Serializer.Merge<FieldDataBase>(info, this);
	}
	public void GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
	{
		Serializer.Serialize<FieldDataBase>(info, this);
	}

	#endregion
}

[ProtoContract, Serializable]
public class Int32FieldData : FieldDataBase
{
	[ProtoMember(1)]
	public int? Int32Value;

	[ProtoIgnore]
	public override object Value
	{
		get { return this.Int32Value.HasValue ? this.Int32Value : null; }
		set { this.Int32Value = (int?)value; }
	}
	public Int32FieldData() { }
	protected Int32FieldData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
		:base(info, context)
	{ }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, looks like there may be an issue with nulls? –  Greg Dean Feb 18 '09 at 23:50
    
In which way "an issue"? Unfortunately, the wire-format has no concept of nulls, so the closest we can do is not transmit it - but either way, the inheritance should work. Are you getting a specific issue? (I've no time to try it right now...) –  Marc Gravell Feb 19 '09 at 0:19
    
For info - due to the encoding details, direct encapsulation would be more efficient than inheritance (by 2-4 bytes per value). –  Marc Gravell Feb 19 '09 at 0:45
    
well - the issue is, as you stated, nulls are not transmitted. I'm working on a work around, but it's getting to be hacky^2 :-) –  Greg Dean Feb 19 '09 at 0:47
    
I guess I should point out, I had moved on to int?[] in which case I ended up serializing {1,2,3,4,null} and getting {1,2,3,4} back –  Greg Dean Feb 19 '09 at 0:58

Direct encapsulation seems to work fine with no additional overhead from all the properties, in the following manner:

[ProtoContract, Serializable]
public class ObjectWrapper : ISerializable
{
	public ObjectWrapper()
	{ }
	[ProtoIgnore]
	public object Value
	{
		get
		{
			if (Int32Value.HasValue)
				return Int32Value.Value;
			else if (BinaryValue != null)
				return BinaryValue;
			else
				return StringValue;
		}
		set
		{
			if (value is int)
				this.Int32Value = (int)value;
			else if (value is byte[])
				this.BinaryValue = (byte[])value;
			else if (value is string)
				this.StringValue = (string)value;
		}
	}
	[ProtoMember(1)]
	private int? Int32Value;
	[ProtoMember(2)]
	private string StringValue;
	[ProtoMember(3)]
	private byte[] BinaryValue;
            // etc

	#region ISerializable Members
	protected ObjectWrapper(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
	{
		Serializer.Merge<ObjectWrapper>(info, this);
	}
	public void GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
	{
		Serializer.Serialize<ObjectWrapper>(info, this);
	}

	#endregion
}
share|improve this answer
    
string and byte[] aren't really necessary in a general sense - I just know I will need them in my specific case –  Greg Dean Feb 19 '09 at 1:40
    
Takes a bit more field storage in the client, though... –  Marc Gravell Feb 19 '09 at 4:07

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