Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a simple struct Wrapper, distinguished by two templated assignment operator overloads:

template<typename T>
struct Wrapper {

  Wrapper() {}

  template <typename U>
  Wrapper &operator=(const Wrapper<U> &rhs) {
    cout << "1" << endl;
    return *this;
  }
  template <typename U>
  Wrapper &operator=(Wrapper<U> &rhs) {
    cout << "2" << endl;
    return *this;
  }
};

I then declare a and b:

Wrapper<float> a, b;
a = b;

assigning b to a will use the non-const templated assignment operator overload from above, and the number "2" is displayed.

What puzzles me is this: If I declare c and d,

Wrapper<float> c;
const Wrapper<float> d;
c = d;

and assign d to c, neither of the two assignment operator overloads is used, and no output is displayed; so the default copy assignment operator is invoked. Why does assigning d to c not use the const overloaded assignment operator provided? Or instead, why does assigning b to a not use the default copy assignment operator?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Why does assigning d to c not use the const overloaded assignment operator provided?

The implicitly-declared copy assignment operator, which is declared as follows, is still generated:

Wrapper& operator=(const Wrapper&);

An operator template does not suppress generation of the implicitly-declared copy assignment operator. Since the argument (a const-qualified Wrapper) is an exact match for the parameter of this operator (const Wrapper&), it is selected during overload resolution.

The operator template is not selected and there is no ambiguity because--all other things being equal--a nontemplate is a better match during overload resolution than a template.

Why does assigning b to a not use the default copy assignment operator?

The argument (a non-const-qualified Wrapper) is a better match for the operator template that takes a Wrapper<U>& than for the implicitly-declared copy assignment operator (which takes a const Wrapper<U>&.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for An operator template does not suppress generation of the implicitly-declared copy assignment operator. –  Nawaz Apr 11 '11 at 18:41

From the C++03 standard, §12.8/9:

A user-declared copy assignment operator X::operator= is a non-static non-template member function of class X with exactly one parameter of type X, X&, const X&, volatile X& or const volatile X&.

And §12.8/10:

If the class definition does not explicitly declare a copy assignment operator, one is declared implicitly.

The fact that your operator= is a template makes it not a copy assignment operator, so the class' implicit copy assignment operator is still generated by the compiler.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.