Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I thought any variable defined in a function would be local but I can easily access variable 'e' outside of its function.

function change() {
 var d = 6; 
  e = 7;
}

change();
alert(e); //> alerts 7
share|improve this question
2  
Did you intend to put a comma after var d = 6? Reason why I ask is because of the extra indentation on e which is typical when defining multiple variables (on multiple lines) in a single var statement. If you replaced the semicolon with a comma, e would be a local variable. –  Cristian Sanchez Apr 11 '11 at 18:48

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Because new variables will enter the global scope by default. var prevents this from happening by constraining a variable's existence to be within the current scope.

share|improve this answer
    
Except when you're in strict mode when you throw ReferenceError when you hit an undeclared variable. –  gsnedders Apr 11 '11 at 18:44
    
But I was taught to only use one 'var' keyword per scope... –  0x499602D2 Apr 11 '11 at 18:44
1  
@user701092 then you were taught by the wrong person, or you misunderstood. (Possibly you were told to only use var once per variable per scope.) –  Pointy Apr 11 '11 at 18:45
3  
@user That suggestion, AFAIK, is from Douglas Crockford and his JSLint. To apply var to multiple declarations, use a comma to separate them: var d = 6, e = 7; –  Jonathan Lonowski Apr 11 '11 at 18:47
    
JSLint suggests a lot of nonsensical things. I suggest ignoring those suggestions. –  Ken Rockot Apr 11 '11 at 18:48

Because it was declared without var it becomes part of the global window object.

share|improve this answer

You've not explicitly declared it as such, so it has taken global scope.

share|improve this answer

Thats because e is global by default, using var make a scope varible. You can read more about this in Javascript Garden Scope and Namespaces

share|improve this answer

I am guessing that you are going under this assumption that

JSLint expects that a var will be declared only once, and that it will be declared before it is used.

Problem with your code is you are using one var, but your second line has no var in front of it. That is pushing that varaible e into the global namespace.

Why is it happening? You used a semicolon instead of a comma in the variable declaration.

function change() {
 var d = 6, //Change this to a comma 
     e = 7;
}

change();
alert(e); //will produce an error now
share|improve this answer

It is surprisingly easy to create global variables, here are some other gotchas I've seen.

// :-( antipattern: implied global variable
function sum(x, y) {
    result = x + y; // result is global
    return result;
}

// :-) better
function sum(x, y) {
    var result = x + y; // result is local
    return result;
}

// :-( antipattern: chain assignments as part of a var declaration
function foo() {
    var a = b = 0; // b is global
}

// :-) better
function foo() {
    var a, b;
    a = b = 0; // both local
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.