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In Java, you can use System.out.println(message) to print a message to the output window.

What's the equivalent in Visual Studio ?

I know when I'm in debug mode I can use this to see the message in the output window:

Debug.WriteLine("Debug : User_Id = "+Session["User_Id"]);
System.Diagnostics.Trace.WriteLine("Debug : User_Id = "+Session["User_Id"]);

How can this be done without debugging in Visual Studio?

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12  
-1 - Learn to love tests and avoid the debugger. Using the debugger is a time sink. There are better ways to "debug" software that don't involve line by line evaluation. –  Ritch Melton Mar 12 '11 at 12:29
5  
The debugger is only useful when you need to step through complex code. We've made good use of it in web applications where the same code is being called multiple times in different contexts; but for simpler stuff the truly correct method is simple outputs. It is faster and less neurotic. –  RiverC Feb 27 '12 at 21:25
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3 Answers

The results are not in the Output window but in the Test Results Detail (TestResult Pane at the bottom, right click on on Test Results and go to TestResultDetails).

This works with Debug.WriteLine and Console.WriteLine.

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THIS was incredibly useful! Thanks. –  kpollock Mar 16 '11 at 15:10
    
Thanks - was wondering where my traces were going! –  Paul Suart Jun 25 '11 at 3:53
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The Trace messages can occur in the output window as well, even if you're not in debug mode. You just have to make sure the the TRACE compiler constant is defined.

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Following Frederik's advice, I found this blog post: How To Use TRACE In VS –  spoulson Feb 18 '09 at 20:09
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The Trace.WriteLine method is a conditionally compiled method. That means that it will only be executed if the TRACE constant is defined when the code is compiled. By default in Visual Studio, TRACE is only defined in DEBUG mode.

Right Click on the Project and Select Properties. Go to the Compile tab. Select Release mode and add TRACE to the defined preprocessor constants. That should fix the issue for you.

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Good tip. In VS10, it's the Build tab, and there's a check box for "Define TRACE constant" now. –  DanM Jan 28 '13 at 22:25
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