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I propose the following desiderata for displaying numbers to non-technical users:

  1. Don't replace significant digits with zeros, as that's ambiguous.
  2. No scientific notation, which is the technically correct way to solve the ambiguity problem.
  3. The above two constraints imply that all significant digits left of the decimal point must be kept. E.g., if we only want 2 significant digits then 1,234,567.89 should become either 1,200,000 (but that violates #1 -- you can't tell whether the trailing zeros are significant or not) or 1.2e6 (but that violates #2). So the best we can do is 1,234,568.
  4. No superfluous precision after the decimal point. E.g., if we only want 2 significant digits then 0.0012345 should become 0.0012.
  5. Display, e.g., "7." as "7" even if it's a real rather than an integer. The trailing dot makes mathematical sense but doesn't really work if, for example, the number is displayed in a sentence.

My current solution is a function that takes -- in addition to the actual number to display, x -- two parameters, d and t, where d is the max number of significant figures to display after the decimal point, and t is the target number of significant figures total (clipped to be at least i and at most i+d, where i is the number of digits in the integer part of x).

For example, with d=2 and t=4, here's how the following numbers get displayed:

   123456 -> "123456"
 1234.456 -> "1234"
  123.456 -> "123.5"
   12.345 -> "12.35"
    1.234 -> "1.23"
   1.0001 -> "1"
    0.123 -> "0.12"
0.0001234 -> "0.00012"

What's a more general / more robust / more convenient / better way to deal with this? (Feel free to argue against my desiderata as well.)

UPDATE: I'd love to see actual code or pseudocode that folks use to deal with this. I'll include what I'm using as an answer as well.

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1  
Well, what data are you displaying? If it's statistics, I'd say that the more confusing, the better, as it sounds more convincing (to me, at least). –  Blender Apr 11 '11 at 20:34
4  
As much as possible, I'd use something like scientific notation, but with SI prefixes, so (for example) "0.123" seconds became "12 ms". –  Jerry Coffin Apr 11 '11 at 20:34
    
"123 ms" but that's a really excellent point! –  dreeves Apr 12 '11 at 4:20
1  
Are use asking how we think the numbers should be displayed? (A question which is (a) more suited for ux.stackexhange.com than here and (b) which can't be answered except for a specific use case - something you did not provide.) or are you asking how to implement your display decision efficiently in a specific language? (which would make it not-language-agnostic). Also, how does this relate to rosetta-stone? –  Danny Varod Feb 7 '13 at 19:56
    
0.12 can be a lot less than 0.123, depending on what is being measured an in what units. 0.12 Tons of something would be worth a lot less than 0.123 Tons of the same thing. –  Danny Varod Feb 7 '13 at 20:20

6 Answers 6

I agree with Jerry Coffin that units are the way to handle this.

Example: two significant digits of 1,234,567.89 is simply 1.2 million.

This is natural and expected for non-technical readers of US English.

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3  
But it can lead to additional confusion, as US English is read worldwide. For example, "billion" means 1e9 in US, but 1e12 in other parts of the world. Even if one knows this, one cannot be sure that the author (or some middle man) hasn't already adjusted for non US readers. –  Ingo Apr 12 '11 at 7:25
    
@Ingo That is one reason to use scientific notation, but if something is being disseminated to a non-technical audience, I think it is a fair trade. It is the compromise I see most often here in the US. Perhaps in other places everyone is familiarized with scientific notation, in which case the original question becomes unnecessary. –  Mr.Wizard Apr 12 '11 at 7:37
1  
You could mention which measure you are using. Either as text somewhere on the page/form, or after the number itself. 1.2 billion (10^9) or 1.2 billion (10^12). –  Markus Jarderot Apr 12 '11 at 10:03
    
There are many cases where spelled out numbers are more natural or traditional: "one billion," "half gallon," "millennium" etc. Roman numerals are also commonly used: "section IV," "Title IX," etc. –  WaywiserTundish Feb 14 '13 at 4:29

Here's a ruby answer that gets you 90% of the way there, but I don't know how to get it not to do scientific notation with small numbers:

def clip(n,a,z)
  [[a,n].max,z].min
end
def shn(x,d,t)
  i = x.abs.floor
  i = i == 0 ? 0 : i.to_s.length
  "%.#{clip(t,i,i+d)}g" % x
end

and the output matches all the cases you give above, but it resorts to scientific notation when there are more than 5 figures past the decimal point (see the last case below)

> shn(123456,2,4) => "123456" 
> shn(1234.456,2,4) => "1234" 
> shn(123.456,2,4) => "123.5" 
> shn(12.3456,2,4) => "12.35" 
> shn(1.3456,2,4) => "1.35" 
> shn(1.0006,2,4) => "1" 
> shn(0.126,2,4) => "0.13" 
> shn(0.0000126,2,4) => "1.3e-05" 
share|improve this answer

I agree with Jerry's suggestion of words or units. This program can do words or SI prefixes, and rounds to exponent multiples of 3 (engineering notation). The million/billion uses US convention, but it's easy to just edit the units structure.

units = { 18: ('exa','E','quintillion'),
          15: ('peta','P','quadrillion'),
          12: ('tera','T','trillion',),
          9: ('giga','G','billion',),
          6: ('mega','M','million',),
          3: ('kilo','k','thousand'),
          0: ('','',''),
          -3: ('milli','m','thousandths'),
          -6: ('micro','u','millionths'),
          -9: ('nano','n','billionths'),
          -12:('pico','p','trillionths'),
          -15:('femto','f','quadrillionths'),
          -18:('atto','a','quintillionths') }

def format_eng(n,sigfigs,divisor=3,dpchar='.'):
    """Use %e interpolation to get requested number of significant
    figures, then adjust exponent to be engineering notation (multiple
    of divisor, normally 3). Return the mantissa as a string (to keep
    correct number of digits) and exponent as an int."""

    fmt_e = "%%.0%ie" % (sigfigs-1)
    numstr = fmt_e % n
    mantissa,exponent = numstr.split('e')
    exponent = int(exponent)
    emod = exponent % divisor
    prefix = exponent - emod

    digits = list(mantissa)
    try:       
        dp = digits.index(dpchar)
        digits.remove(dpchar)

        # ensure that len(mantissa) >= 1 + emod
        padding = emod + 1 - len(digits)
        if padding > 0:
            digits.extend("0"*padding)

        move = dp + emod
        if dp+emod < len(digits): # don't insert dp at the end
            digits.insert(dp+emod,dpchar)

        numpart = "".join(digits)
    except ValueError: # no decimal point, pad zeros if needed
        numpart = mantissa + emod * "0"

    return (numpart,prefix)


def desiderize(x,unit=None,sigfigs=3,base=10,spacer=" "):
    numstr,prefix = format_eng(x,sigfigs)

    if len(unit) > 1 and int(float(numstr) != 1):
        plural = "s"
    else:
        plural = ""

    if abs(prefix) > max(units.keys()):
        # don't have a good unit, number too big or small, just use scientific
        return numstr + ("e%i" % prefix) + spacer + unit + plural

    if not unit:
        unit = ''
        unit_index = 2
    elif len(unit) > 1:
        unit_index = 0
    else:
        unit_index = 1

    return numstr + spacer + units[prefix][unit_index] + unit + plural


nums = [123456,1234.456,123.456,12.345,1.234,
        1.0001,0.123,0.0001234,
        12349349034890349083408348903489034890]

for n in nums:
    for sf in (1,3,5):
        print("%i significant figures" % sf)
        for u in ('','m','meter'):
            print("%12s => %-10s" % (n,desiderize(n,unit=u,sigfigs=sf)))

The output is:

1 significant figures
      123456 => 100 thousand
      123456 => 100 km    
      123456 => 100 kilometers
3 significant figures
      123456 => 123 thousand
      123456 => 123 km    
      123456 => 123 kilometers
5 significant figures
      123456 => 123.46 thousand
      123456 => 123.46 km 
      123456 => 123.46 kilometers
1 significant figures
    1234.456 => 1 thousand
    1234.456 => 1 km      
    1234.456 => 1 kilometer
3 significant figures
    1234.456 => 1.23 thousand
    1234.456 => 1.23 km   
    1234.456 => 1.23 kilometers
5 significant figures
    1234.456 => 1.2345 thousand
    1234.456 => 1.2345 km 
    1234.456 => 1.2345 kilometers
1 significant figures
     123.456 => 100       
     123.456 => 100 m     
     123.456 => 100 meters
3 significant figures
     123.456 => 123       
     123.456 => 123 m     
     123.456 => 123 meters
5 significant figures
     123.456 => 123.46    
     123.456 => 123.46 m  
     123.456 => 123.46 meters
1 significant figures
      12.345 => 10        
      12.345 => 10 m      
      12.345 => 10 meters 
3 significant figures
      12.345 => 12.3      
      12.345 => 12.3 m    
      12.345 => 12.3 meters
5 significant figures
      12.345 => 12.345    
      12.345 => 12.345 m  
      12.345 => 12.345 meters
1 significant figures
       1.234 => 1         
       1.234 => 1 m       
       1.234 => 1 meter   
3 significant figures
       1.234 => 1.23      
       1.234 => 1.23 m    
       1.234 => 1.23 meters
5 significant figures
       1.234 => 1.2340    
       1.234 => 1.2340 m  
       1.234 => 1.2340 meters
1 significant figures
      1.0001 => 1         
      1.0001 => 1 m       
      1.0001 => 1 meter   
3 significant figures
      1.0001 => 1.00      
      1.0001 => 1.00 m    
      1.0001 => 1.00 meter
5 significant figures
      1.0001 => 1.0001    
      1.0001 => 1.0001 m  
      1.0001 => 1.0001 meters
1 significant figures
       0.123 => 100 thousandths
       0.123 => 100 mm    
       0.123 => 100 millimeters
3 significant figures
       0.123 => 123 thousandths
       0.123 => 123 mm    
       0.123 => 123 millimeters
5 significant figures
       0.123 => 123.00 thousandths
       0.123 => 123.00 mm 
       0.123 => 123.00 millimeters
1 significant figures
   0.0001234 => 100 millionths
   0.0001234 => 100 um    
   0.0001234 => 100 micrometers
3 significant figures
   0.0001234 => 123 millionths
   0.0001234 => 123 um    
   0.0001234 => 123 micrometers
5 significant figures
   0.0001234 => 123.40 millionths
   0.0001234 => 123.40 um 
   0.0001234 => 123.40 micrometers
1 significant figures
12349349034890349083408348903489034890 => 10e36     
12349349034890349083408348903489034890 => 10e36 m   
12349349034890349083408348903489034890 => 10e36 meters
3 significant figures
12349349034890349083408348903489034890 => 12.3e36   
12349349034890349083408348903489034890 => 12.3e36 m 
12349349034890349083408348903489034890 => 12.3e36 meters
5 significant figures
12349349034890349083408348903489034890 => 12.349e36 
12349349034890349083408348903489034890 => 12.349e36 m
12349349034890349083408348903489034890 => 12.349e36 meters
share|improve this answer

We have so many numerical forms available because of their conveniences for various common number quantities and applications. The issue with these forms for the lay person is their sacrifice of ease of understanding for ease of notation and compactness.

Even positional notation isn't all that easy to intuitively understand for those versed in it. (How big is 0.0000001? Did you have to count the zeroes? Did you accidentally think one millionth instead of one ten millionth? Etc..)

Instead of trying to tackle all of the desirable forms with one generic form, I propose to allow for multiple forms selected by one set of rules. Furthermore, the resulting forms should be similar to their compact counterparts but made easier for the lay person.

Since the target audience is the lay person, localization will always be key. I will assume the locale in this instance is the US (since I am from the US and this is what's most familiar to me) and no attempts to generalize locale numbering rules will be made here -- that's an "implementation detail" if you like this scheme.

Furthermore, I will not be assuming you want the numbers to look nice when in a spreadsheet (such as having aligned decimal points) or be easy to identify or parse by a machine. I will assume you're interested in displaying one number by itself in a friendly, relevant, and human-readable way.

I've hastily written some example code in C# and posted it on pastebin. It takes the number to be formatted and a desired relative accuracy parameter. Then it tries to format the number in several ways (listed later), each with a priority of how human readable it is. The best priority that's within the desired accuracy is output. Otherwise, the best achieved accuracy is output.

Forms I've identified as being "easy to read" and similar in intent to normal formatting and scientific notation are as follows:

  • Straight integer (345)
  • Simple fraction (e.g. 5/6ths)
  • Mixed fraction (e.g. 3 and 5/6ths)
  • Zero-padded (e.g. 7 followed by 300 zeroes)
  • Postfixed (e.g. 7 million, 7 millionths)
  • Compound postfixed (7 million million)
  • Fractional postfix and compound postfix (2/3rds of a million million)

Unfortunately I haven't had time to implemented all of these schemes, but I've implemented most of them. One issue I can't seem to crack is how to represent extremely small magnitude numbers without using a clever description in the specific context. (e.g. half the width of a human hair)

However, for normal and large magnitude numbers this technique appears to work very well. With added formats I'd expect it to work well for small magnitude numbers.

A sample of the results:

Number     Accuracy   Formatted Result
3.343e100  0.05       33 followed by 99 zeroes
12.3456    0.05       12
12.3456    0.02       12 and 1/3rd
12.3456    0.0005     12.35
12.3456    0.0001     12.346
3.343e10   0.05       33 billion
3.343e10   0.01       33 and 3/7ths billion
3.343e15   0.01       3 and 1/3rd million billion
3.343e15   0.001      3.34 million billion
3.343e15   0.0001     3.343 million billion
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Here's what I'm currently using for this in my Mathematica code:

(* Show Number. Convert to string w/ no trailing dot. Use at most d significant
   figures after the decimal point. Target t significant figures total (clipped
   to be at least i and at most i+d, where i is the number of digits in integer
   part of x). Can also specify explicit prefix strings for positive and 
   negative numbers, typically for when you want an explicit plus sign in front
   positive numbers, like for specifying a delta. *)

re = RegularExpression; cat = ToString;

shn[x_?NumericQ, d_: 5, t_: 16, s_: {"-", ""}] :=
 With[{i = IntegerLength@IntegerPart@x},
  StringReplace[
   cat@NumberForm[N@x,
     Clip[t, {i, i + d}],
     ExponentFunction -> (Null &),
     NumberSigns -> s],
   re@"\\.$" -> ""]]

shn[x_, ___] := cat[x]
share|improve this answer
    
I changed your code a little. You know what to do if you disapprove. –  Mr.Wizard Apr 16 '11 at 13:13
    
Looks nicer; thanks! (If you're sure you didn't break anything! :) –  dreeves Apr 16 '11 at 15:42
    
lol, only one way to find out! –  Mr.Wizard Apr 16 '11 at 15:49

Don't use a comma for the thousands separator, use a space.

Keep the punctation for separating the whole number from the fractional part.

12,000 is twelve thousand in the US, and 12 point zero in Europe.

12.000 is twelve thousand in Europe, and 12 point zero in the US.

If you instead use 12 000 for twelve thousand, the reader will quickly catch on that the other one (whether it be 12,000 or 12.000) is the 12 point zero version.

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3  
-1 This looks like 12 and 0 to me. You can't give general advice for global users, this is what localization is for. Also, in the UK 12.000 is 12 and 12,000 is 12000. –  Danny Varod Feb 7 '13 at 19:58
    
apostrophe could be used as a non-local thousands separator: 12'000 (This might be confused with the prime symbol (′) though.) –  accolade Nov 3 '13 at 3:57

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