Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

we need to code an online web journal management system in Java. It's not an Amazon, but also more than a Hello World.

Should we use a framework? If yes, why? What are some good Java Web frameworks out there that are simple?

share|improve this question
6  
java != 'simple' –  jondavidjohn Apr 11 '11 at 20:36
    
Have you tried looking here? –  Greg Hewgill Apr 11 '11 at 20:37
    
@Greg Hewgill Yes, I have. Java is a requirement for our project. I've found some good stuff on Play framework but wanted to get a fresh set of opinions. –  siamii Apr 11 '11 at 20:44
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes.

A Web framework should be used for all applications which are more complex than "Hello, World!". There's no need to reinvent the wheel. Web frameworks contain many useful tested components which you will almost certainly need on your site. They also help organize your code, often into an MVC or similar paradigm, which will make your code more maintainable.

Some Java Web Frameworks (in no particular order):

share|improve this answer
    
Don't forget Stripes –  Ophidian Apr 11 '11 at 20:42
    
@Ophidian - Added, thanks –  Adam Apr 11 '11 at 20:49
add comment

Start developing without any framework and you will definitely notice yourself if you need one or not. Once more than half of your code is infrastructure for your web components, this can be a clue you should have chosen a framework rather than develop one yourself.

As a better example, use System.out.println() for logging, enhance that with some specialised package that also provides functionality like writing to a file, then add formatting to log messages and when you realise you spent half a year to develop your own poor home-made version of log4j (or whatever), someone will complain and say you should have chosen a logging framework from the very beginning and spend one or two weeks to learn how to use it.

Don't get me wrong, sometimes a mere System.out.println() wrapper is enough and a framework only adds overhead. Unfortunately, that scenario is a rarity these days...

EDIT: I am (or used to be) an anti-framework type of developer at the core so I've learned all the above "the hard way".

For a web framework suggestion: Apache Wicket

share|improve this answer
add comment

You should use a framework when you want to create something real and spend most of your time solving the problem at hand and not dealing with the underlying technology so much (e.g peristence, templating, infrastructure etc).

A good all around framework which provides tons of integration with other frameworks is Spring Framework.

share|improve this answer
add comment

A simple web framework is the play framework. Watch the screen cast on the playframework.org homepage. I am sure you will be convinced.

share|improve this answer
add comment

As @cherouvim mentioned, it's worth using a framework if you anticipate the need for "commodity technologies" like persistence, templating, routing, etc. That is, if you think your website will require non-trivial use of a database or complicated layouts and views (which are almost always present in a web application).

Check out Grails, it's based on the Spring framework but far easier to learn, manage, and use, in my opinion. Plus it's comparable to Ruby on Rails, which is another popular web application framework worth considering.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.