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I was wondering if there is any lightweight way I could instrument a production JVM to gather information over a period of some months to gather statistics on unused code in my code base.

Thanks a lot for looking at this.

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Do you want to find unused (or rarely used) code among among all your deployments? ( to factor out non frequent workflows, sort of pattern mining) or you want to do a dead code analysis. The latter can be easily accomplished using some static code anlayzer. –  doc_180 Apr 11 '11 at 20:52
    
@doc_180 The way the question is formulated, I suspect it's the first one. It would be quite useful indeed, even if it just created a diff between the classes loaded and those packaged in certain JAR files. –  biziclop Apr 11 '11 at 21:00
    
@biziclop. I do not know of any of the shelf product that could do that. the only solution I could think of is to have an implementation of AOP and using method pointcuts to log all usage of methods and have a collection of all the methods you have in all your classses and calculate delta. –  doc_180 Apr 11 '11 at 21:26
    
@doc_180 I don't either, but it sounds like something useful. I'd probably take the sampling approach though, instrumenting every single method is just too much of an overhead on a production environment. And if you're running it for months, I guess you could get away with one thread dump per minute. –  biziclop Apr 11 '11 at 22:22
    
Thanks..Pattern mining is what I am basically after..not static dead code analysis. –  pvsk10 Apr 12 '11 at 3:44

1 Answer 1

File this under "experimental science project". But the invoke dynamic feature coming in JDK7 was used in an interesting low-overhead test coverage prototype.

Maybe a bit too bleeding-edge today, but interesting once Java 7 is out.

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