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When a subclass inherits main() from a superclass, is it possible to determine the actual class invoked on the command-line? For example, consider the following two classes, in which main is implemented by A and inherited by B:

public class A {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        // Replace with <some magic here> to determine the class 
        //    invoked on the command-line
        final Class<? extends A> c = A.class;
        System.out.println("Invoked class: " + c.getName());

        final A instance = c.newInstance();
        // Do something with instance here...
    }
}

public class B extends A {
}

We can invoke B successfully (i.e., B does 'inherit' main - at least in whatever sense static methods can be inherited), but I have not found a method to determine the actual class invoked by the user:

$ java -cp . A
Invoked class: A

$ java -cp . B
Invoked class: A

The closest I've come is to require that the subclass implement main() and call a helper method in the superclass, which then reads the thread stack to determine the calling class:

public class AByStack {

    public static void run(String[] args) throws Exception {
        // Read the thread stack to find the calling class
        final Class<? extends AByStack> c = (Class<? extends AByStack>)
            Class.forName(Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace()[2].getClassName());
        System.out.println("Invoked class: " + c.getName());

        final AByStack instance = c.newInstance();
        // Do something with instance here...
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        run(args);
    }
}

public class BByStack extends AByStack {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        // Call the master 'run' method
        run(args);
    }
}

This method works:

$ java -cp . AByStack
Invoked class: AByStack

$ java -cp . BByStack
Invoked class: BByStack

But I'd really like to eliminate the requirement that subclasses implement main() (yes, call me picky...). I don't mind if it requires some ugly code, since it will be implemented once and buried in the base class, and I'm mostly interested in Sun/Oracle VMs, so I'd be willing to consider using a private sun.misc class or something similar.

But I do want to avoid platform-dependencies. For example, on Linux, we can look at /proc/self/cmdline, but that's of course not portable to Windows (I'm not sure about Mac OS - I don't have my Mac with me at the moment to test this trick). And I think JNI and JVMTI are out for the same reason. I might be wrong about JVMTI, but it looks to me like it would require a C wrapper. If not, perhaps we could use that interface somehow.

This question was asked years ago at http://www.coderanch.com/t/375326/java/java/Getting-command-line-class. The best answer there required a static initializer block in each subclass - a different, but similar requirement on the subclass author to the main calling run() solution I demonstrated. But I haven't seen more recent discussions; I'm hopeful that current VMs might allow access to information that wasn't available at the time of that discussion.

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1  
What is the end goal this exercise is trying to accomplish? You may find there is a better alternative. –  corsiKa Apr 11 '11 at 21:44
    
My goal is to make the subclasses as simple as possible, requiring the subclass author only implement abstract methods from the superclass. Although various conventions of implementing main() are possible (as described in the original question or in various proposed answers), none can be enforced statically at compile time (since there is no concept of an 'abstract static' method), and we'd prefer to push as much code as possible into the shared superclass. –  AaronD Apr 11 '11 at 23:01
    
Perhaps I wasn't clear in what I was asking. The goal of your REAL program can't be to display the run-time calling class, can it? What is the business-need that this example is supposed to solve? –  corsiKa Apr 11 '11 at 23:03
    
You're right - displaying the calling class isn't an end-goal. The superclass implements argument parsing, I/O, and methods performing network interactions with our servers. It calls back into the subclass via an abstract run() method. Subclasses implement operations like 'filter input from STDIN and send output to a server using a superclass method'. The goal is to make implementing a tool as simple and foolproof as possible for tool authors. And no, having to follow a convention to implement main() isn't terrible, but I'll remove that requirement if possible. Did that help clarify at all? –  AaronD Apr 11 '11 at 23:15
    
Why not use a Strategy pattern, where main() creates an object (could be of its enclosing class) based on a system property? Then you have true overriding and inheritance. –  Snowman Apr 11 '11 at 23:41

3 Answers 3

Presumably you want this so that some tool can be called with different names, but behave largely the same depending on the name it was invoked with? Or some similar magic?

In which case, you could simply have an actual main() method in all the sub-classes and delegate to a method which also takes the name of the invoked class:

public class Super {
    protected void doMain(String invokee, String... args) {
        System.out.println("I was invoked as: " + invokee);
    }
}

public class ToolA {
    public static void main(String... args) {
        new Super().doMain("ToolA", args);  // or ToolA.class.getName() to be refactor-proof
    }
}
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I think I would simply modify the signature of the run() method, and rather than using the call stack, implement main() in each subclass as:

public class BByStack extends AByStack {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        // Call the master 'run' method
        run(BByStack.class, args);
    }
}

If all you are doing is instantiating using the default constructor, I would even just pass in

new BByStack()

I don't know of any way to do what you're asking; the method is static, so you can't get a handle to this.getClass() or the like; if the method is not defined on the subclass, you also can't get that information from the stack.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since I've wasted considerably more time investigating than the problem warranted, I'll post my conclusions here.

First, to try to reiterate the rationale for the question:

I have abstracted argument-handling, I/O, and other shared tasks into an abstract superclass, which I expect others to extend. After performing argument parsing and shared setup, a static method in the superclass instantiates an instance of the subclass and calls its run() method.

Authors of subclasses are encouraged to implement public static void main(String[]) and call the superclass's primary entry point. But, unlike the requirement that all subclasses implement run(), we cannot enforce that requirement statically at compile time (since Java has no concept of an abstract static method).

So I'm trying to implement a main(String[]) method in the superclass which can determine the name of the subclass which was requested on the command-line and instantiate the appropriate class.

I've found two methods, both specific to the Sun / Oracle JVM.

The first uses internal sun.jvmstat classes:

import java.lang.management.ManagementFactory;
import sun.jvmstat.monitor.MonitoredVmUtil;
import sun.jvmstat.monitor.VmIdentifier;
import sun.jvmstat.perfdata.monitor.protocol.local.LocalMonitoredVm;

...

public static String jvmstatMainClass() {
    // Determine the VMID (on most platforms, this will be the PID)
    final String pid = ManagementFactory.getRuntimeMXBean().getName().split("@")[0];

    // Connect to the virtual machine by VMID
    final VmIdentifier vmId = new VmIdentifier(pid);
    final LocalMonitoredVm lmVm = new LocalMonitoredVm(vmId, 1000);

    // Find the requested main-class
    String mainClass = MonitoredVmUtil.mainClass(lmVm, true);

    // And detach from the VM
    lmVm.detach();

    return mainClass;
}

The second uses Sun's jps utility:

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;

...

public static String jpsMainClass() {
    // Determine the VMID (on most platforms, this will be the PID)
    final String pid = ManagementFactory.getRuntimeMXBean().getName().split("@")[0];

    // Execute the 'jps' utility
    final Process jps = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(new String[] { "jps", "-l" });
    final BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(jps.getInputStream()));

    // Parse the output of jps to find the current VM by PID
    for (String line = br.readLine(); line != null; line = br.readLine()) {
        final String[] split = line.split(" ");
        if (pid.equals(split[0])) {
                return split[1];
            }
        }
    }
    return null;
}

Hopefully my wasted time will prove helpful to someone else.

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