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Find the first covering prefix of a given array.

A non-empty zero-indexed array A consisting of N integers is given. The first covering prefix of array A is the smallest integer P such that and such that every value that occurs in array A also occurs in sequence.

For example, the first covering prefix of array A with A[0]=2, A[1]=2, A[2]=1, A[3]=0, A[4]=1 is 3, because sequence A[0], A[1], A[2], A[3] equal to 2, 2, 1, 0 contains all values that occur in array A.

My solution is

int ps ( int[] A ) 
{
    int largestvalue=0;
    int index=0;   

    for(each element in Array){
        if(A[i]>largestvalue)
        {
            largestvalue=A[i];
            index=i;
        }
    }

    for(each element in Array)
    {
        if(A[i]==index)
            index=i; 
    }   
    return index;
}

But this only works for this input, this is not a generalized solution.

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1  
Uhhhh, whats the purpose of the second for loop? –  Amir Afghani Apr 11 '11 at 21:52
    
Possible duplicate - stackoverflow.com/questions/5531553/… –  mre Apr 11 '11 at 21:59
    
Yes it's a duplicate as this is not language specific –  Antti Huima Apr 11 '11 at 22:02
1  
"such that and such that" I think you didn't write one of the conditions –  Argote Apr 11 '11 at 22:03
    
@antti.huima: was that sarcasm? –  mre Apr 11 '11 at 22:14

12 Answers 12

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I would do this

int coveringPrefixIndex(final int[] arr) {
    Map<Integer,Integer> indexes = new HashMap<Integer,Integer>();
    // start from the back
    for(int i = arr.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        indexes.put(arr[i],i);
    }
    // now find the highest value in the map
    int highestIndex = 0;
    for(Integer i : indexes.values()) {
        if(highestIndex < i.intValue()) highestIndex = i.intValue();
    }
    return highestIndex;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you 1 correction it should be highestIndex<i.intValue –  Raj Apr 11 '11 at 22:21
    
@Raj that's a good point. I'll fix it for future reference. Thanks for that. –  corsiKa Apr 11 '11 at 22:34
    
I think you need to look out for duplicate elements case. This solution wouldn't work if your prefix ends then you get a repeated element. I'd add an 'if' condition in the first 'for' loop to find if you've already inserted an item. If so, then update the value with the lower index. –  mbadawi23 Jun 8 '13 at 15:13
    
@mbadawi23 If you notice, it iterates from the end backwards, so it automatically replaces with the lower index. :-) –  corsiKa Jun 10 '13 at 14:34

Got 100% with the below.

public int ps (int[] a)
    {
        var length = a.Length;
        var temp = new HashSet<int>();
        var result = 0;

        for (int i=0; i<length; i++)
        {
            if (!temp.Contains(a[i]))
            {
                temp.Add(a[i]);
                result = i;
            }
        }
        return result;
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
The best solution here... I did something similar, but I went other way round: created an array of unique values and was removing values from it as I found them, when it got to Count == 0, that was the prefix... got only 94% for that thugh. –  Daniel Gruszczyk Mar 4 '13 at 13:27
    
Hi Daniel, yes that would work as well. I think because you are adding and removing, it may be slightly less efficient then looking up and adding which I am using. Even though they are all o(1) operations for hashsets. I am curious to know which condition did it deduct the 6% for? –  dopplesoldner Mar 12 '13 at 17:46
1  
Detected time complexity: O(N) or O(N*log(N)) –  Yuriy Chernyshov Jul 5 '13 at 4:43
    
@YuriyChernyshov This solution is O(N) complexity –  dopplesoldner Dec 18 '13 at 15:42
    
I used the same logic except I chose Hashmap over hashset. I got only 88%. my performance % was only 81%. Any reason why? The performance degraded for 10,000 and 100,000 elements. –  semantic_c0d3r Mar 31 at 6:06

Your question is from Alpha 2010 Start Challenge of Codility platform. And here is my solution which got score of 100. The idea is simple, I track an array of counters for the input array. Traversing the input array backwards, decrement the respective counter, if that counter becomes zero it means we have found the first covering prefix.

public static int solution(int[] A) {
    int size = A.length;
    int[] counters = new int[size];

    for (int a : A)
        counters[a]++;

    for (int i = size - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        if (--counters[A[i]] == 0)
            return i;
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
What if the array has following values [10, 0, 5, 0, 10]? counters[10] should throw, right? –  Nemanja Boric Oct 7 '13 at 23:08
    
Sorry, just saw the note: each element of array A is an integer in range [0..N-1]. Good job! –  Nemanja Boric Oct 7 '13 at 23:13

100p

public static int ps(int[] a) {
    Set<Integer> temp = new HashSet<Integer>();
    int p = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
        if (temp.add(a[i])) {
            p = i+1;
        }
    }
    return p;
}
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You can try this solution as well

import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Set;

class Solution {
    public int ps ( int[] A ) {
        Set set = new HashSet();
        int index =-1;

        for(int i=0;i<A.length;i++){
            if(set.contains(A[i])){
                if(index==-1)
                    index = i;
            }else{
                index = i;
                set.add(A[i]);
            }         
        }
        return index;
    }
}
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here's my solution in C#:

public static int CoveringPrefix(int[] Array1)
    {
        // Step 1. Get length of Array1
        int Array1Length = 0;
        foreach (int i in Array1) Array1Length++;
        // Step 2. Create a second array with the highest value of the first array as its length
        int highestNum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < Array1Length; i++)
        {
            if (Array1[i] > highestNum) highestNum = Array1[i];
        }
        highestNum++;   // Make array compatible for our operation
        int[] Array2 = new int[highestNum];
        for (int i = 0; i < highestNum; i++) Array2[i] = 0; // Fill values with zeros
        // Step 3. Final operation will determine unique values in Array1 and return the index of the highest unique value
        int highestIndex = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < Array1Length; i++)
        {
            if (Array2[Array1[i]] < 1)
            {
                Array2[Array1[i]]++;
                highestIndex = i;
            }
        }
        return highestIndex;
    }
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Without using any Collection:
search the index of the first occurrence of each element,
the prefix is the maximum of that index. Do it backwards to finish early:

private static int prefix(int[] array) {
    int max = -1;
    int i = array.length - 1;
    while (i > max) {
        for (int j = 0; j <= i; j++) { // include i
            if (array[i] == array[j]) {
                if (j > max) {
                    max = j;
                }
                break;
            }
        }
        i--;
    }
    return max;
}

// TEST

private static void test(int... array) {
    int prefix = prefix(array);
    int[] segment = Arrays.copyOf(array, prefix+1);
    System.out.printf("%s = %d = %s%n", Arrays.toString(array), prefix, Arrays.toString(segment));
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    test(2, 2, 1, 0, 1);
    test(2, 2, 1, 0, 4);
    test(2, 0, 1, 0, 1, 2);
    test(1, 1, 1);
    test(1, 2, 3);
    test(4);
    test();  // empty array
}
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This is what I tried first. I got 24%

public int ps ( int[] A ) {
int n = A.length, i = 0, r = 0,j = 0;

for (i=0;i<n;i++) {
    for (j=0;j<n;j++) {
        if ((long) A[i] == (long) A[j]) {
            r += 1;
        }
        if (r == n) return i;
    }
}
return -1;
}
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    //method must be public for codility to access
public int solution(int A[]){
    Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>(A.length);
    int index= A[0];
    for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
        if( set.contains(A[i])) continue;
        index = i;
        set.add(A[i]);
    }   
    return index;
}

this got 100%, however detected time was O(N * log N) due to the HashSet. your solutions without hashsets i don't really follow...

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shortest code possible in java:

    public static int solution(int A[]){
    Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>(A.length);//avoid resizing
    int index= -1; //value does not matter;
    for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) 
        if( !set.contains(A[i])) set.add(A[index = i]); //assignment + eval     
    return index;
}
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I got 100% with this one:

public int solution (int A[]){
    int index = -1;
    boolean found[] = new boolean[A.length];

    for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++)
        if (!found [A[i]] ){
            index = i;
            found [A[i]] = true;
        }

    return index;    
}

I used a boolean array which keeps track of the read elements.

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// you can also use imports, for example:
import java.util.*;

// you can use System.out.println for debugging purposes, e.g.
// System.out.println("this is a debug message");

    class Solution {
        public int solution(int[] A) {
            // write your code in Java SE 8
            Set<Integer> s = new HashSet<Integer>(); 
            int index = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
                if (!s.contains(A[i])) {
                    s.add(A[i]);
                    index = i;
                }
            }
            return index;
        }
    }
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1  
the question was not about how to debug a program. –  AbcAeffchen Aug 25 '14 at 2:02

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