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While Hive supports positive like queries: ex.

select * from table_name where column_name like 'root~%';

Hive Does not support negative like queries: ex.

select * from table_name where column_name not like 'root~%';

Does anyone know an equivalent solution that Hive does support?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Check out https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/Hive/LanguageManual if you haven't. I reference it all the time when I'm writing queries for hive.

I haven't done anything where I'm trying to match part of a word, but you might check out RLIKE (in this section https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/Hive/LanguageManual+UDF#Relational_Operators)

This is probably a bit of a hack job, but you could do a sub query where you check if it matches the positive value and do a CASE (http://wiki.apache.org/hadoop/Hive/LanguageManual/UDF#Conditional_Functions) to have a known value for the main query to check against to see if it matches or not.

Another option is to write a UDF which does the checking.

I'm just brainstorming while sitting at home with no access to Hive, so I may be missing something obvious. :)

Hope that helps in some fashion or another. \^_^/

EDIT: Adding in additional method from my comment below.

For your provided example colName RLIKE '[^r][^o][^o][^t]~\w' That may not be the optimal REGEX, but something to look into instead of sub-queries

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it looks like CASE will do what I need it to, but Im having trouble with the syntax. Does it go in the Select clause or the Where clause? This attempt failed: 'create table tmp_table as CASE WHEN a.username like 'twitter~%' THEN '' ELSE select sum(file_size) as storage, sum(bandwidth) as bandwidth from tmp_sites_compare1 a;' But it doesnt make sense to me for it to be in the where clause... Thoughts? –  CMaury Apr 12 '11 at 18:11
    
@CMaury: The CASE is in the SELECT clause. SELECT CASE WHEN ... THEN ... END AS colName FROM... –  Nija Apr 12 '11 at 19:00
1  
@CMaury: I started playing around with RLIKE for something at my work, and while it's not going to be optimal for all situations you can use the regex 'not' ^. For your provided example colName RLIKE '[^r][^o][^o][^t]~\\w' That may not be the optimal REGEX, but something to look into instead of sub-queries –  Nija Apr 13 '11 at 4:03
    
Haha. yea, that is even better than sub-queries... Thanks for all the help. Accepting your answer. –  CMaury Apr 13 '11 at 20:31
1  
To do a negative regex lookahead you can do (?!root) but note that if you are doing that in bash you will need to escape the ! like \! so bash doesn't think it is an event. so hive -e "SELECT * FROM table_name WHERE colName RLIKE '^(?\!root~).*$'" should work exactly like the not like in other DBs –  Kyle Kochis May 18 '11 at 14:51

Try this:

Where Not (Col_Name like '%whatever%')

also works with rlike:

Where Not (Col_Name rlike '.*whatever.*')
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NOT LIKE have been supported in HIVE version 0.8.0, check at JIRA.

https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/HIVE-1740

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Actually, you can make it like this:

select * from table_name where not column_name like 'root~%';
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In SQL:

select * from table_name where column_name not like '%something%';

In Hive:

select * from table_name where not (column_name like '%something%');
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