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I'm trying to create functions out of existing code in order to make it cleaner, and I'm having some problems:

It used to be:

int foo(char * s, char * t, char ** out) {
  int val = strcmp(s, t);
  if (val == 0) {
     *out = strdup(s);
     return 1;
  } else {
     *out = strdup(t);
     return 5;
  }
  return 0;
}

Now I have:

int foo(char * s, char * t, char ** out) {
  someFunction(s, t, out);
  printf("%s", *out);
  return 0;
}

int someFunction(char *s, char * t, char **out) {

  int val = strcmp(s, t);
  if (val == 0) {
     *out = strdup(s);
     return 1;
  } else {
     *out = strdup(t);
     return 5;
  }
  return 0;
}

And I'm getting segmentation faults when I try to do the printf. Should someFunction be expecting a *out? I guess I'm still confused.

share|improve this question
7  
What does someFunction look like? Also, that can't be the code you compiled and ran, since it's missing a function name. Please paste the real code (culled for brevity, of course). – Marcelo Cantos Apr 11 '11 at 22:41
1  
It would also be helpful to see how you are calling the (currently nameless) function. Specifically, what are you passing in for values s, t, and out? A complete, compilable example that reproduces your segfault would be ideal. – Ken Rockot Apr 11 '11 at 22:44
    
I tried to fix it as best I can. – Rio Apr 11 '11 at 22:49
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This code is "correct" if I understand your intent. I assume you are doing something along the lines of

char *s = "foo";
char *t = "bar";
char *out;
foo(s, t, out);

when you really want

char *s = "foo";
char *t = "bar";
char *out;
foo(s, t, &out);  // Note the & which passes the address of a char* to be manipulated
share|improve this answer
    
Is foo here = someFunction? – Rio Apr 11 '11 at 22:55
    
No, foo is your foo. You are calling foo somewhere. Your call to foo must be incorrect (as in my first example), because there is nothing wrong with the way foo is calling someFunction, or with the way that someFunction manipulates *out. – Ken Rockot Apr 11 '11 at 22:57
    
In other words, you are providing an invalid char** for the out argument of foo. This ultimately causes a segfault when someFunction attempts a write to the invalid memory address. – Ken Rockot Apr 11 '11 at 22:58
    
So even if foo calls someFunction, ultimately out is always accessible with the right content? – Rio Apr 11 '11 at 23:05
1  
I'm not sure what you mean by "always accessible." out is a pointer to a pointer. You pass it from foo over to someFunction. There is nothing wrong with the way you are doing this in the code you've provided. It is correct code. Your segfault must mean that your problem is in how you call foo. You have not posted that code though, so it cannot be analyzed. – Ken Rockot Apr 11 '11 at 23:12

I would convert it this way:

int foo(char * s, char * t, char ** out) {
    int val = strcmp(s, t); 
    *out = val ? strdup(t) : strdup(s);
    return val ? 5 : 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
While this may be an acceptable way to refactor the function foo (though I would disagree as it tests val twice), it does not actually answer the question that was asked. – Ken Rockot Apr 11 '11 at 22:55
    
A note of thanks though, every attempt asking a question here is a) preceded by at least half an hour of head-banging-against-table and then followed by a zen-like appreciation for newfound knowledge. – Rio Apr 11 '11 at 22:59

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