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Hey guys, I'm trying to create a systematic list generator in Java however I've come into slight error. Our example is pizza.

Problem: Suppose you have 6 total toppings to make pizzas with. How many variations of 5 topping pizza's can you possibly make?

So for example :

[Pepperoni, Bacon, Pineapple, Onion, Mushrooms, Peppers] [Pepperoni, Bacon, Pineapple, Onion, Mushrooms, Cheese] etc...

While developing, I have been practising with 3 possible options apposed to 6, as I know there will be three total combinations each with two elements, making my multi-dimentional array easy to generate at this time.

public class SystematicList {

static String options[] = {
    "Pepperoni",
    "Bacon",
    "Cheese"
};

public static void main(String[] args) {

    /**
     * Generate a multi-dimensional array to represent the combinations of
     * pizza toppings we can possibly have from the available <code>options</code>
     *
     */
    String[][] combos = new String[3][2];

    /**
     * Ideally what we would like to create.
     * combos[0][0] = "Pepperoni";
     * combos[0][1] = "Bacon";
     * combos[1][0] = "Pepperoni";
     * combos[1][1] = "Cheese";
     * combos[2][0] = "Bacon";
     * combos[2][1] = "Cheese";
     */
    for (int pizzas = 0; pizzas < combos.length; pizzas++) {
        for (int toppings = 0; toppings < combos[pizzas].length; toppings++) {
            combos[pizzas][toppings] = options[0]; // <<< issue : element.
            System.out.print(" " + combos[pizzas][toppings]);
        }
        System.out.println("");
    }

    /*
     * Current Output :
     * run:
     *  Pepperoni Bacon
     *  Pepperoni Bacon
     *  Pepperoni Bacon
     * BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 0 seconds)
     * 
     * ^ this is obvious, as I currently do not know how I'll select an
     * element from the array of topping options before/after a specified
     * index [example: 0 which would than range 1 - 2 apposed to 0 - 2
     * thus 'dropping' an optional element, making this much easier.
     *
     * Loop is virtually only doing the actions of :
     * 0 : 1,2
     * 1 : 1,2
     * 2 : 1,2
     */
}

}

I have decided to generate a 2D list to store the values.

int[# possible combinations][# possible values]

My current code assumes we already know the possible combinations (though we of course do not), and regardless we can always determine values (how many 5, 4, 3, 2 topping pizzas can be built)

How am I able to select an element from options[] while ensuring no other array already contains those elements you're trying to insert. I would have tried Arrays.contains or Arrays.equals however I would not know what to insert to compare with, combos[pizzas-1] ?

if (!Arrays.contains(combos[pizzas], combos[pizzas-1]) {
combos[pizzas][toppings] = options[?];
}
share|improve this question
    
Do you want to store every combination of toppings? What for? This should be somehow computed on-the-fly when necessary. –  pajton Apr 11 '11 at 22:48
    
is this homework? –  TofuBeer Apr 11 '11 at 22:54

2 Answers 2

One way is to only look at toppings you haven't considered yet. So for instance when choosing three toppings from [Pepperoni, Bacon, Pineapple, Onion, Mushrooms, Peppers, Cheese], you might decide to skip cheese, then choose peppers, then skip mushrooms and onion, and choose pineapple and bacon. You need to leave enough toppings to finish your pizza of course, so you can't skip cheese, peppers, mushrooms, onion and pineapple. Sample code in JavaScript using a recursive algorithm to give you an idea.

function combos(toppings, count) {
  var result = [];
  helper(result, [], toppings, toppings.length, count);
  return result;
}

function helper(result, selection, toppings, length, count) {
  if (count == 0) // no more toppings left to add
    result.push(selection); // this must be a solution
  else
    // start at --count because we need to be able to add other toppings
    for (var i = --count; i < length; i++)
      // add the selected topping to the selection
      // then consider toppings we haven't looked at yet
      helper(result, selection.concat([toppings[i]]), toppings, i, count);
}
share|improve this answer

I wouldn't use an array to hold the pizza options. You have 2 columns for toppings. What if I want a plain cheese pizza?

Here is a solution that uses recursion to build pizzas of different number of toppings.

public static List<String> getPizzas( List<String> ingredients )
{
    if( ingredients.isEmpty() )
    {
        List<String> pizzas = new ArrayList<String>();
        String plainPizza = "";
        pizzas.add( plainPizza );
        return pizzas;
    }
    else if( ingredients.size() == 1 )
    {
        List<String> pizzas = new ArrayList<String>();
        String plainPizza = "";
        String oneToppingPizza = ingredients.get( 0 );

        pizzas.add( plainPizza );
        pizzas.add( oneToppingPizza );
        return pizzas;
    }
    else
    {
        List<String> pizzas = new ArrayList<String>();

        for( String onePizza : getPizzas( ingredients.subList( 1, ingredients.size() )))
        {
            String pizzaWithoutTopping = onePizza;
            String pizzaWithTopping = ingredients.get( 0 ) + " " + onePizza;
            pizzas.add( pizzaWithTopping );
            pizzas.add( pizzaWithoutTopping );
        }
        return pizzas;
    }
}

public static void main( String[] args )
{
    String options[] = { "Pepperoni", "Bacon", "Cheese" };

    for( String onePizza : getPizzas( Arrays.asList( options ) ) )
    {
        System.out.println( onePizza );
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Alex B, original poster here. The full objective I'm tying to accomplish is not only to add toppings to the pizza, but also create as many different pizza's with that same number toppings as possible. The reason the example used new int[3][2] is because I had intended on using 3 options, to create the max possible variations(i knew would be 3) using combinations of two values. [1,2] [1,3] [2,3] so ideally if the computer could generate lists like that by taking into consideration the options and the amount of toppings and then I would be content. –  user706385 Apr 13 '11 at 15:47

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