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I'm a complete CUDA beginner and I'm trying to figure out how to write and compile a test CUDA program using Visual Studio.

I have the CUDA 4 toolkit installed and both the 2008 and 2010 versions of Visual Studio installed. I read that starting with CUDA 4.0, support for the VS100 compiler has been added, I just have no idea how to set my project to use NVCC and whether or not that is all I need to do to compile a basic program. If there is no support for VS100, I will gladly use VS2008 and the VS90 compiler, but I still don't know how to make the project use the CUDA 4.0 compiler.

I would be very grateful if someone could explain how to get this done. Thank you all in advance!

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I wrote a couple of tutorials on how to do this.

http://www.ademiller.com/blogs/tech/2011/03/using-cuda-and-thrust-with-visual-studio-2010/

http://www.ademiller.com/blogs/tech/2011/04/using-cuda-and-thrust-with-vs-2010-part-2-x64-builds/

These are for 4.0 RC not RC2 but they should be fine. First thing I'd recommend is to install NVIDIA NSight 1.51. This will solve most of the basic setup issues for you. You need both VS 2010 and 2008 for the v90 compiler.

Then work through the tutorials.

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Thank you! Everything ended up working after working through both guides, as I'm using the 64 bit toolkit. I should mention that the build customization targets file for CUDA 4 did not automatically show up for me, and I had to locate it in the installation directory. –  Carlos Daniel Gadea Omelchenko Apr 12 '11 at 7:26
    
Oops, spoke too soon. Had a problem that I thought is worth mentioning -> When setting the Linker|Input|Additional Dependencies field for the CUDA project, I had to make sure that All Configurations and All Platforms are selected from the dropdown list before adding “cudart.lib;”. This is probably very obvious to a seasoned developer, but it took me a while to figure out why only 5 out of 8 builds would succeed. : ) –  Carlos Daniel Gadea Omelchenko Apr 12 '11 at 7:45
    
Carlos: Thanks for the feedback. I'll try and get the posts updated. These sort of things are hard for me to catch because my machine has had many versions of CUDA on it prior to writing the posts. –  Ade Miller Apr 12 '11 at 14:25
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