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I have a class template ResourceManager and it is intended to be used something like this:

ResourceManager<Image>* rm =
    ResourceManager<Image>::Instance();

Image* img = rm->acquire("picture.jpg");
rm->release(img);

I'd like to use dependency injection (pass the ResourceManager as a parameter to functions that are supposed to use it instead of having it used globally), however given that it's a template I don't know how to do this. Do you have any suggestions?

My game is only at the beginning of the development and I already have four resource types (Image, Font, Animation and Sound) so making a single ResourceManager (i.e. not a template) with an acquire function for each type of resource is not an option.


Edit: Some clarifications.

What I'm looking for is not how to do dependency injection for one type of ResourceManager, but for all of them at once.

My GameState objects need to load resources when they are initialized/opened; they do so through the ResourceManagers. However, GameStates may need to load any number of types of resources: animations, fonts, images, sounds, etc — that's a lot of function parameters for each kind of ResourceManager! What do you suggest I do?

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1  
I suggest to write a smart pointer to automatically call release() at the end of the scope. The time required to do so will be earned back the first time you have to debug a resource leak caused by some (exceptional) code path forgetting to call release(). –  Sjoerd Apr 12 '11 at 7:05
    
I might do that, but ftm. I'll just focus on getting this part right. :) –  Paul Manta Apr 12 '11 at 12:23

4 Answers 4

Well, if the function needs a particular kind of resource (most will, probably), just define the specific template instance as parameter:

function(ResourceManager<Image> *rm, ...);

If the function needs any kind of resource than it can either

  1. Be a template itself, like:

    template <typename T>
    function(ResourceManager<T> *rm, ...);
    

    It will probably need to refer to the resource obtained from resource manager, so it will need the template argument in more places anyway.

  2. Use a polymorphic base class. That would mean you'd have to define something like

    class ResourceManagerBase { /* methods you need to call via the base class */ };
    template <typename T>
    class ResourceManager : ResourceManagerBase { ... };
    
    function(ResourceManagerBase *rm, ...)
    

    The function can call any methods defined in the base class. If the methods depend on resource-type internally, they will be declared abstract virtual (virtual returnType method(...) = 0) in the base and defined in the template class itself. You can also use dynamic_cast to check which particular instantiation of ResourceManager you've got.

    Note, that if the function needs to refer to the resource, you will similarly need a ResourceBase abstract base class of all resources, so you can refer to any kind of resource.

The choice is matter of trade-off between faster but very large code with template function (the function will be compiled for each specialization separately) or slower but smaller code with virtual methods (call to virtual method is slower, but there is no code duplication). Also the template variant will compile slower, because most compilers will generate the code for each object file that uses it and than merge identical copies at link time.

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First. Remember when you use templates, you must resolve everything at compile time.

Then ResourceManager in your code seems a singleton. So there's no difference, rougly speaking, with a global variable.

And I think that is useless pass rm as parameters of your functions when you can call the singleton directly.

And this resolves, I hope, your question.

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Please read up on testability and dependency injection; there's some good stuff available at martinfowler.com/design.html. –  Cwan Apr 12 '11 at 8:18

An example using constructor injection:

template<typename T>
struct ResourceManager
{
  virtual T* acquire(std::string const& resourceName)
  { return ...; }
  ... etc ...
};

class ImageUser
{
  ResourceManager<Image>* rm_;

  public:
  explicit ImageUser(ResourceManager<Image>* rm)
    : rm_(rm)
  {}

  ImageUser()
    : rm_(ResourceManager<Image>::Instance())
  {}

  void UseImage()
  {
    Image* img = rm_->acquire("picture.jpg");
    rm_->release(img);
  }
};


struct ImageResourceManagerFake : ResourceManager<Image>
{
  virtual Image* acquire(std::string const& resourceName) // override
  { return <whatever-you-want>; }
  ... etc ...
};

void test_imageuser()
{
  ImageResourceManagerFake* rm = new ImageResourceManagerFake;
  ImageUser iu(rm);
  ... test away ...
}

Note that I've left out all resource management; use smart pointers etc wherever applicable.

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Sorry, I had to down-vote you. What you're showing isn't proper DI: your second constructor (without any parameters) instantiated the ResourceManager itself. Also, I see my question caused a lot of confusion about what I'm actually looking for. I edited my OP. (Sorry for that.) –  Paul Manta Apr 12 '11 at 12:21
    
@Paul: It is proper DI; to be precise it allows for DI when you need it and allows for easy usage when you need the standard behavior. If you could point me to where the opposite is said, please do so. (My original post actually left out the default constructor, but I added it to show that the previous behavior could be easily preserved). –  Cwan Apr 13 '11 at 6:02
    
@Paul: Oh, and yes, the edit of your question made my answer pretty much irrelevant. –  Cwan Apr 13 '11 at 6:05
    
@Cwan It shouldn't be possible to allow 'easy usage' dependencies should always be made perfectly clear in the interface, they shouldn't be buried in the implementation. That's the whole point of DI. –  Paul Manta Apr 13 '11 at 8:00
    
@Paul: Sorry, but in my opinion the whole point of DI is to allow substitution of implementation for various purposes (such as testing). Please point me to some reliable source where otherwise is stated. If you're not convinced by this I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree ... –  Cwan Apr 13 '11 at 8:32

Even after your edit I find it a little hard to understand what you're after without seeing the whole picture, but I'll make a second attempt at a basic example:

template<typename T>
struct ResourceManager
{
  virtual T* acquire(std::string const& resourceName)
  { return ...; }
  // ... etc ...
};

class ImageUser
{
  ResourceManager<Image>* rm_;

  public:
  explicit ImageUser(ResourceManager<Image>* rm)
    : rm_(rm)
  {}

  void UseImage()
  {
    Image* img = rm_->acquire("picture.jpg");
    rm_->release(img);
  }
};

template<typename T>
struct ResourceManagerFake : ResourceManager<T>
{
  T* acquireRetVal;
  virtual T* acquire(std::string const& resourceName)
  { return acquireRetVal; }
  // ... etc ...
};

void test_imageuser()
{
  ResourceManagerFake<Image>* rm = new ResourceManagerFake<Image>;
  rm->acquireRetVal = new Image;
  ImageUser iu(rm);

  iu.UseImage();
}

Note to commenters: I'm well aware of the resource leaks, but that's not the point here.

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