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I'm working with a very restrictive embedded processor, which only has 128 bytes of ram. I'd like to implement SHA1 on it. RFC3174 describes, in 'method 2', a way of implementing SHA1 that doesn't require allocating an array of 80 32-bit words (which, at 320 bytes, is obviously not practical), and seems like it ought to be usable on my processor. I'm unable to find any implementations of 'method 2', though, and the sample code in the RFC only implements the default method.

Is anyone aware of a memory-efficient implementation of SHA1 in C or C++?

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Method 2 suggests you need 16 4-byte (32-bit) words, or 64 bytes. Surely the SHA1 algorithm will require some more storage than that. So you have less than 64 bytes of RAM left to hold the message being encrypted; you also presumably have to send the encrypted result. What is that you have, that fits in such a small amount of storage, that requires SHA1 to encrypt? –  Ira Baxter Apr 12 '11 at 4:56
    
1  
"128 bytes of RAM"?! My toaster has more! –  Stephen Canon Apr 12 '11 at 5:02
1  
@Greg: No, it's not a duplicate. Your link wants to compute the hash of a file without having to load it into memory all at once. This is trivial -- all implementations support it. But this OP wants to implement the SHA-1 algorithm without having to build the internal 320-byte W array from the algorithm specification. This can be done, but it's not trivial. –  TonyK Apr 12 '11 at 5:49
1  
@Nick: Whoa, now it's HMAC-SHA-1. That's a different story. If you can do that in 128 bytes, then you're a better programmer than I am. –  TonyK Apr 12 '11 at 6:41
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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You should be able to quickly adapt the method 1 source to method 2. The function to change is Sha1ProcessMessageBlock() in method 1. Initialize w[0:15] from message, then do a loop of 0 to 79, where you only do w[] manipulation after iteration 16, and temp calculation depends on ts value (0-19 uses one, 20-39 uses another, etc). The important thing to remember is using index%16 or index & 0x0f whenever you are addressing the w[] array.

A quick modification would be something like this (double check all accesses to w to make sure I haven't missed the t & 0x0f):

void SHA1ProcessMessageBlock(SHA1Context *context)
{
    const uint32_t K[] =    {       /* Constants defined in SHA-1   */
                            0x5A827999,
                            0x6ED9EBA1,
                            0x8F1BBCDC,
                            0xCA62C1D6
                            };
    int           t;                 /* Loop counter                */
    uint32_t      temp;              /* Temporary word value        */
    uint32_t      W[16];             /* Word sequence               */
    uint32_t      A, B, C, D, E;     /* Word buffers                */

    /*
     *  Initialize the first 16 words in the array W. You can move this to your
     *  context.
     */
    for(t = 0; t < 16; t++)
    {
        W[t] = context->Message_Block[t * 4] << 24;
        W[t] |= context->Message_Block[t * 4 + 1] << 16;
        W[t] |= context->Message_Block[t * 4 + 2] << 8;
        W[t] |= context->Message_Block[t * 4 + 3];
    }


    A = context->Intermediate_Hash[0];
    B = context->Intermediate_Hash[1];
    C = context->Intermediate_Hash[2];
    D = context->Intermediate_Hash[3];
    E = context->Intermediate_Hash[4];

    for(t = 0; t < 80; t++) {
        if (t >= 16) {
            W[t&0xf] = SHA1CircularShift(1,W[(t-3)&0xf] ^ W[(t-8)&0xf] ^ W[(t-14)&0xf] ^ W[t&0xf]);

        }

        if (t<20) {
            temp =  SHA1CircularShift(5,A) +
                    ((B & C) | ((~B) & D)) + E + W[t&0xf] + K[0];
        }
        else if (t<40) {
            temp = SHA1CircularShift(5,A) + (B ^ C ^ D) + E + W[t&0xf] + K[1];
        }
        else if (t < 60) {
            temp = SHA1CircularShift(5,A) +
                   ((B & C) | (B & D) | (C & D)) + E + W[t&0xf] + K[2];
        }
        else {
            temp = SHA1CircularShift(5,A) + (B ^ C ^ D) + E + W[t&0xf] + K[3];
        }
        E = D;
        D = C;
        C = SHA1CircularShift(30,B);
        B = A;
        A = temp;
    }

    context->Intermediate_Hash[0] += A;
    context->Intermediate_Hash[1] += B;
    context->Intermediate_Hash[2] += C;
    context->Intermediate_Hash[3] += D;
    context->Intermediate_Hash[4] += E;

    context->Message_Block_Index = 0;
}

There are still savings to be made: get rid of W[] array on stack and put it in context pre-initialized with the data you get.

Also, you need a lot of pre-processing before calling this function. For example, if all your messages are less than 55 bytes, you can put it in W array, add padding, and process immediately. If not, you'll have to call process twice: first with your partially padded input, and again with the rest of the pad, etc. That sort of thing would be very application specific, and I doubt you'll be able to find the code to do it for you.

By the way, the code above is a straight adaptation from the type 1 source from your link. You can probably squeeze a bit more out of it if you try to optimize it further.

I couldn't think of a way to get any savings on the intermediate hash, so you will need a total of 108 bytes for this (109 if counter is also in RAM), and 24 of which is local to this function, and can be reused in other places - so long as they are also temporary. So it is very hard to do what you want to do.


EDIT: If all your messages are less than 55 bytes, you can save another 20 bytes in your context by getting rid of the intermediate_hash[] storage. Simply initialize A-E from the constants, and add the constants at the end. Finally, instead of storing them in a separate variable, overwrite your input when this function ends.

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Thanks! I'd independently implemented the initial optimisation on the plane, using the basic source from the RFC (eg, with many small loops instead of the one large one you're using above). One other thing to bear in mind is that the processor I'm using has a decent number of registers (32 8-byte ones), so hopefully the compiler can shift some of the work into registers, freeing up stack. –  Nick Johnson Apr 12 '11 at 13:12
    
@Nick One thing to watch out for the many small loops approach is that W values are temporary. That's why everything is stuck into the same loop. You calculate W[t], and immediately use it for the temp variable. If you are referring to the big loop, but counting to 0-20, 20-40, etc. in order to get rid of the large if chain, then that is probably a good idea speed-wise, but it may waste some ROM space. –  vhallac Apr 12 '11 at 13:33
    
I can see it will lead to more instructions generated, but I'm not sure how that relates to the temporary-ness of W. Can you elaborate? –  Nick Johnson Apr 12 '11 at 22:39
    
Probably you don't need the warning if you did it the way I suggested (as in 0-20, 20-40, etc.). An easy trap to fall into would be attempting to separate out W[t] calculations and A-E calculations in different loops (actually, trying to keep the same loops from the method 1 implementation), which clearly won't work because we are constantly overwriting elements in the W array as we go through the loop. It was probably an unnecessary comment on my side. –  vhallac Apr 12 '11 at 23:49
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I have implemented SHA-1 for several memory-constrained environments. You can get by with

DWORD W[16] ;        // instead of H[80]
DWORD H[5] ;         // Intermediate hash value
DWORD BitCount[2] ;  // Probably a single DWORD is enough here

plus a few bytes of housekeeping. W is updated on the fly, as a circular buffer, instead of being generated at the start of each round.

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Right - this is pretty much what's described in method 2. Is there an existing implementation out there that I can use, though, or am I going to have to implement it myself? –  Nick Johnson Apr 12 '11 at 6:14
    
@Nick: How can we tell, if you don't let us know what processor you're using? –  TonyK Apr 12 '11 at 6:38
    
@TonyK I'm asking for an implementation in C; processor considerations shouldn't be a huge component. Nevertheless - it's an Atmel ATTiny24. –  Nick Johnson Apr 12 '11 at 6:59
    
@Nick: I'm sorry to have to break this to you, but you are going to have to program this in assembly language. –  TonyK Apr 12 '11 at 7:07
    
@TonyK That may end up being the case, but I don't think its a foregone conclusion. –  Nick Johnson Apr 12 '11 at 10:27
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working example:

#include<iostream>
#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string>

using namespace std;

unsigned CircularShift(int bits, unsigned word)
{
    return ((word << bits) & 0xFFFFFFFF) | ((word & 0xFFFFFFFF) >> (32-bits));
}

int main(void)
{
    string mess;
    cin >> mess;
    unsigned int lm = mess.length();
    unsigned int lmb = lm*8;
    unsigned char *messc;
    messc=(unsigned char*)malloc((sizeof(unsigned char))*64);

    for (unsigned short int i =0;i<64;i++)
    {
        messc[i]=char(0x00);
    }
    for(int i=0;i<mess.length();i++)
    {
        messc[i]=mess[i];
    }
    messc[lm]=(unsigned char)128;
    messc[56] = (lmb >> 24) & 0xFF;
    messc[57] = (lmb >> 16) & 0xFF;
    messc[58] = (lmb >> 8) & 0xFF;
    // messc[59] = (lmb) & 0xFF;
    messc[60] = (lmb >> 24) & 0xFF;
    messc[61] = (lmb >> 16) & 0xFF;
    messc[62] = (lmb >> 8) & 0xFF;
    messc[63] = (lmb) & 0xFF;
    for(int i =0 ;i<64;i++)
    {
        cout<< hex << (int)messc[i] << " ";
    }
    unsigned *H;
    H=(unsigned*)malloc(5*sizeof(unsigned));
    H[0]        = 0x67452301;
    H[1]        = 0xEFCDAB89;
    H[2]        = 0x98BADCFE;
    H[3]        = 0x10325476;
    H[4]        = 0xC3D2E1F0;
    const unsigned K[]={0x5A827999,0x6ED9EBA1,0x8F1BBCDC,0xCA62C1D6};
    int         t;
    unsigned    temp;
    unsigned    *W;
    unsigned    A, B, C, D, E;
    W=(unsigned*)malloc(80*sizeof(unsigned));
    unsigned char *messh;
    messh=(unsigned char*)malloc(64*sizeof(unsigned char));
    int k;
    for(t = 0; t < 16; t++)
    {
        W[t] = ((unsigned) messc[t * 4])<< 24; ;
        W[t] |= ((unsigned) messc[t * 4 + 1])<< 16;
        W[t] |= ((unsigned) messc[t * 4 + 2]) << 8;
        W[t] |= ((unsigned) messc[t * 4 + 3]);
    }
    for(t = 16; t < 80; t++)
    {
        W[t] = CircularShift(1,W[t-3] ^ W[t-8] ^ W[t-14] ^ W[t-16]);
    }

    A = H[0];
    B = H[1];
    C = H[2];
    D = H[3];
    E = H[4];

    for(t = 0; t < 20; t++)
    {
        temp = CircularShift(5,A) + ((B & C) | ((~B) & D)) + E + W[t] + K[0];
        temp &= 0xFFFFFFFF;
        E = D;
        D = C;
        C = CircularShift(30,B);
        B = A;
        A = temp;
    }

    for(t = 20; t < 40; t++)
    {
        temp = CircularShift(5,A) + (B ^ C ^ D) + E + W[t] + K[1];
        temp &= 0xFFFFFFFF;
        E = D;
        D = C;
        C = CircularShift(30,B);
        B = A;
        A = temp;
    }

    for(t = 40; t < 60; t++)
    {
        temp = CircularShift(5,A) +
                ((B & C) | (B & D) | (C & D)) + E + W[t] + K[2];
        temp &= 0xFFFFFFFF;
        E = D;
        D = C;
        C = CircularShift(30,B);
        B = A;
        A = temp;
    }

    for(t = 60; t < 80; t++)
    {
        temp = CircularShift(5,A) + (B ^ C ^ D) + E + W[t] + K[3];
        temp &= 0xFFFFFFFF;
        E = D;
        D = C;
        C = CircularShift(30,B);
        B = A;
        A = temp;
    }

    H[0] = (H[0] + A) & 0xFFFFFFFF;
    H[1] = (H[1] + B) & 0xFFFFFFFF;
    H[2] = (H[2] + C) & 0xFFFFFFFF;
    H[3] = (H[3] + D) & 0xFFFFFFFF;
    H[4] = (H[4] + E) & 0xFFFFFFFF;

    cout <<"\nTHIS IS SHHHHHAAAAAAAAAAA\n";
    for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
    {
        cout << hex << H[i] << " ";
    }

    //Message_Block_Index = 0;


}
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All things considered, looking at your requirements, I think you are going to have to change your specs. Either a bigger chip, or a simpler algorithm. Even implementing SHA-1 (without HMAC) would be a challenge, but it should be doable.

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