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Consider this program:

public class test {
    public static void main(String [] args){
        Runnable r = new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                System.out.print("foo");
            }
        };
        Thread t = new Thread(r) {
            public void run() {
                System.out.print("bar");
            }
        };
        t.start();
    }
}

On running the output is

bar

I would like to know why is that so.

My understanding:

We instantiate an anonymous inner class that implements Runnable by overriding run method. And assign it to r.

Next we pass this runnable to the Thread class constructor. But we also create a new anonymous inner class that extends Thread by overriding run.

So we have two run methods now and the 2nd will take preference over the 1st.

I'm very confused please correct me if I'm wrong.

Also are such crazy things used in real world Java programming? (My Prof says yes and thats what keeps us going :D).

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4 Answers 4

Though you pass a Runnable instance to the constructor, you're overriding the run method in such way, that it doesn't use r.

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What happens is that the standard Thread.run method calls run on the Runnable that you passed in. In your case you are overriding the Thread's behaviour and replacing it with a run method that ignores the given Runnable.

Such crazy things do happen in the real world, unfortunately. That's why it's a good idea to use static analysis tools and unit tests to make sure you get the behaviour you expect :)

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You are overriding the default behaviour for a thread when you override its run() method. In this way you control the order and whether r is run at all.

public void run() { // ignores "r"
    System.out.print("bar");
}

or

public void run() { 
    super.run(); // runs "r" first.
    System.out.print("bar");
}

or

public void run() { 
    System.out.print("bar");
    super.run(); // runs "r" second.
}

or

public void run() { 
    super.run(); // runs "r" first.
    System.out.print("bar");
    super.run(); // and runs "r" second.
}

or

public void run() { 
    r.run(); // runs "r" first.
    System.out.print("bar");
    r.run(); // and runs "r" second.
}
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The method Thread.run() normally looks if the thread was constructed with a runnable. In this case it calls Runnable.run(), otherwise does nothing. You changed this behaviour by overriding Thread.run() and thus your runnable is never called.

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