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I m trying to kill a process by its pid, and this is the script that I found from web.

PID=`ps -ef | grep myProcess | grep -v grep | awk '{print $2}'`  
echo -e Killing myProcess with pid: $PID..  

Output: Killing myProcesswith pid: 13275^M..

Does anyone know why is there a ^M , how do I get rid of that because the kill command failed to run :

**arguments must be process or job IDs**

I searched online but still got no idea how to overcome this.. Any help is appreciated!! Thanks!

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4 Answers 4

first, your syntax is wrong. Use $() to call a command and store its output to variable

PID=$(ps -ef | grep myProcess | grep -v grep | awk '{print $2}')

second, you can do this all in one awk statement without the need for extra grep processes.

ps -eo pid,args | awk '/myProces[s]/{cmd="kill  "$1;print cmd; }'
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Thanks for the info, I ll give it a try! –  Wilson60 Apr 19 '11 at 1:42

From a quick read online, the print command to awk always appends a newline (which can sometimes be represented by Control-M, or ^M).

It would appear that printf would be a suitable alternative. Maybe:

PID=ps -ef | grep myProcess | grep -v grep | awk '{printf "%i",$2}'
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syntax is wrong. –  kurumi Apr 12 '11 at 6:16
    
@kurumi - sorry, I'm not able to test it at the moment - what do I need to adjust? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 12 '11 at 6:18
    
see my answer –  kurumi Apr 12 '11 at 6:20

From what I see, you dont want to kill a process by PID, by its name. And you do it by getting the process PID and then try to kill it via PID. If you want to kill by name, use killall processname.

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You can just use :

PID=`pidof myProcess`
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