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The default databinding on TextBox is TwoWay and it commits the text to the property only when TextBox lost its focus.

Is there any easy XAML way to make the databinding happen when I press the Enter key on the TextBox?. I know it is pretty easy to do in the code behind, but imagine if this TextBox is inside some complex DataTemplate.

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7 Answers

up vote 71 down vote accepted

You can make yourself a pure XAML approach by creating an attached behaviour.

Something like this:

public static class InputBindingsManager
    {

        public static readonly DependencyProperty UpdatePropertySourceWhenEnterPressedProperty = DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached(
            "UpdatePropertySourceWhenEnterPressed", typeof(DependencyProperty), typeof(InputBindingsManager), new PropertyMetadata(null, OnUpdatePropertySourceWhenEnterPressedPropertyChanged));

        static InputBindingsManager()
        {

        }

        public static void SetUpdatePropertySourceWhenEnterPressed(DependencyObject dp, DependencyProperty value)
        {
            dp.SetValue(UpdatePropertySourceWhenEnterPressedProperty, value);
        }

        public static DependencyProperty GetUpdatePropertySourceWhenEnterPressed(DependencyObject dp)
        {
            return (DependencyProperty)dp.GetValue(UpdatePropertySourceWhenEnterPressedProperty);
        }

        private static void OnUpdatePropertySourceWhenEnterPressedPropertyChanged(DependencyObject dp, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            UIElement element = dp as UIElement;

            if (element == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            if (e.OldValue != null)
            {
                element.PreviewKeyDown -= HandlePreviewKeyDown;
            }

            if (e.NewValue != null)
            {
                element.PreviewKeyDown += new KeyEventHandler(HandlePreviewKeyDown);
            }
        }

        static void HandlePreviewKeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
        {
            if (e.Key == Key.Enter)
            {
                DoUpdateSource(e.Source);
            }
        }

        static void DoUpdateSource(object source)
        {
            DependencyProperty property =
                GetUpdatePropertySourceWhenEnterPressed(source as DependencyObject);

            if (property == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            UIElement elt = source as UIElement;

            if (elt == null)
            {
                return;
            }

            BindingExpression binding = BindingOperations.GetBindingExpression(elt, property);

            if (binding != null)
            {
                binding.UpdateSource();
            }
        }
    }

Then in your XAML you set the InputBindingsManager.UpdatePropertySourceWhenEnterPressedProperty property to the one you want updating when the Enter key is pressed. Like this

<TextBox Name="itemNameTextBox"
Text="{Binding Path=ItemName, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}" b:InputBindingsManager.UpdatePropertySourceWhenEnterPressed="TextBox.Text"/>

(You just need to make sure to include an xmlns clr-namespace reference for "b" in the root element of your XAML file pointing to which ever namespace you put the InputBindingsManager in).

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1  
There's a small bug in the above code that took me a bit to figure out. Make sure that the Get and Set functions have the same name as the dependency property. They're both missing the final "Property" in their names. –  Scott Bilas Dec 11 '09 at 19:06
1  
@Scott, Thanks for picking that up. The bug is actually that the name of the property supplied as the first parameter to RegisterAttached shouldn't have 'Property' at the end. –  Samuel Jack Dec 14 '09 at 9:23
    
mate, it'd be great if you could actually update your code then :) Great answer! –  flq Apr 16 '10 at 15:03
    
@Frank: Fixed! Thanks for the prompt. –  Samuel Jack Apr 19 '10 at 7:52
1  
I just got done using this code and you can't imagine the time and effort you saved me. Thank you. I think this is one of the best answers of all time. –  MikeMalter Feb 13 '13 at 1:47
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I don't believe that there's any "pure XAML" way to do what you're describing. You can set up a binding so that it updates whenever the text in a TextBox changes (rather than when the TextBox loses focus) by setting the UpdateSourceTrigger property, like this:

<TextBox Name="itemNameTextBox"
    Text="{Binding Path=ItemName, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}" />

If you set UpdateSourceTrigger to "Explicit" and then handled the TextBox's PreviewKeyDown event (looking for the Enter key) then you could achieve what you want, but it would require code-behind. Perhaps some sort of attached property (similar to my EnterKeyTraversal property) woudld work for you.

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Thank you for your simple solution to this, works perfectly. –  Jim Beam Dec 2 '09 at 21:47
    
Thanks it works like charm. –  plan9assembler May 19 '12 at 15:06
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You could easily create your own control inheriting from TextBox and reuse it throughout your project.

Something similar to this should work:

public class SubmitTextBox : TextBox
{
    public SubmitTextBox()
        : base()
    {
        PreviewKeyDown += new KeyEventHandler(SubmitTextBox_PreviewKeyDown);
    }

    void SubmitTextBox_PreviewKeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.Key == Key.Enter)
        {
            BindingExpression be = GetBindingExpression(TextBox.TextProperty);
            if (be != null)
            {
                be.UpdateSource();
            }
        }
    }
}

There may be a way to get around this step, but otherwise you should bind like this (using Explicit):

<custom:SubmitTextBox
    Text="{Binding Path=BoundProperty, UpdateSourceTrigger=Explicit}" />
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In WPF/Silverlight you should never use inheritance - it messes styles and is not as flexible as Attached Behaviors. For example with Attached Behaviors you can have both Watermark and UpdateOnEnter on the same textbox. –  Mikhail Jan 16 '12 at 12:57
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This is how I solved this problem. I created a special event handler that went into the code behind:

private void TextBox_KeyEnterUpdate(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.Key == Key.Enter)
    {
        TextBox tBox = (TextBox)sender;
        DependencyProperty prop = TextBox.TextProperty;

        BindingExpression binding = BindingOperations.GetBindingExpression(tBox, prop);
        if (binding != null) { binding.UpdateSource(); }
    }
}

Then I just added this as a KeyUp event handler in the XAML:

<TextBox Text="{Binding TextValue1}" KeyUp="TextBox_KeyEnterUpdate" />
<TextBox Text="{Binding TextValue2}" KeyUp="TextBox_KeyEnterUpdate" />

The event handler uses its sender reference to cause it's own binding to get updated. Since the event handler is self-contained then it should work in a complex DataTemplate. This one event handler can now be added to all the textboxes that need this feature.

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I think there's a mistake in Samuel Jack's answer :

b:InputBindingsManager.UpdatePropertySourceWhenEnterPressedProperty="TextBox.Text"

should be :

b:InputBindingsManager.UpdatePropertySourceWhenEnterPressed="TextBox.Text"

This made my VS2010 not happy at all when I copied/pasted and tried to run my app.

PS: I can't comment Samuel's answer because I don't have enough reputation ; how do new users do when they see a mistake in other's people answers ???

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what you've done here is fine. This way you can quote/format the code better. –  Kirk Woll Mar 22 '11 at 16:37
    
Thanks for the fix. I've updated my answer now. –  Samuel Jack Mar 22 '11 at 17:07
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In case you are using MultiBinding with your TextBox you need to use BindingOperations.GetMultiBindingExpression method instead of BindingOperations.GetBindingExpression.

// Get the correct binding expression based on type of binding
//(simple binding or multi binding.
BindingExpressionBase binding = 
  BindingOperations.GetBindingExpression(element, prop);
if (binding == null)
{
    binding = BindingOperations.GetMultiBindingExpression(element, prop);
}

if (binding != null)
{
     object value = element.GetValue(prop);
     if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value.ToString()) == true)
     {
         binding.UpdateTarget();
     }
     else
     {
          binding.UpdateSource();
     }
}
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Here is an approach that to me seems quite straightforward, and easier that adding an AttachedBehaviour (which is also a valid solution). We use the default UpdateSourceTrigger (LostFocus for TextBox), and then add an InputBinding to the Enter Key, bound to a command.

The xaml is as follows

       <TextBox Grid.Row="0" Text="{Binding Txt1}" Height="30" Width="150">
        <TextBox.InputBindings>
            <KeyBinding Gesture="Enter" 
                        Command="{Binding UpdateText1Command}"
                        CommandParameter="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource FindAncestor,AncestorType={x:Type TextBox}},Path=Text}" />
        </TextBox.InputBindings>
    </TextBox>

Then the Command methods are

Private Function CanExecuteUpdateText1(ByVal param As Object) As Boolean
    Return True
End Function
Private Sub ExecuteUpdateText1(ByVal param As Object)

    If TypeOf param Is String Then
        Txt1 = CType(param, String)
    End If
End Sub

And the TextBox is bound to the Property

 Public Property Txt1 As String
    Get
        Return _txt1
    End Get
    Set(value As String)
        _txt1 = value
        OnPropertyChanged("Txt1")
    End Set
End Property

So far this seems to work well and catches the Enter Key event in the TextBox.

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