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I have a field in my mysql table having timestamp data type. I am saving data into that table. But when I pass the timestamp(1299762201428) to save record, it automatically saves value '0000-00-00 00:00:00' into that database table.

So how to store the timestamp in mysql table?

Here is my save query.

INSERT INTO table_name (id,d_id,l_id,connection,s_time,upload_items_count,download_items_count,t_time,status) VALUES (1,5,9,'2',1299762201428,5,10,20,'1'),(2,5,9,'2',1299762201428,5,10,20,'1')
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What timestamp you're talking about? Where did you get it? –  Your Common Sense Apr 12 '11 at 9:05
    
can u paste ur table structure here ? –  user319198 Apr 12 '11 at 9:06
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14 Answers 14

up vote 60 down vote accepted

pass like this

date('Y-m-d H:i:s','1299762201428')
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no. I want to save timestamp. not date. –  lakumg Apr 12 '11 at 8:56
4  
but the value you get in db shows the column type is datetime, if you want to change it to timestamp then change the column type to varchar(15) –  jimy Apr 12 '11 at 8:57
2  
Then put it on an INT field. Anyway, a timestamp is only a representation of a date, and vice versa. You can convert from timestamp to date with the function jimy told you, and the other way with strtotime. edit: btw, timestamp only covers a range of all possible dates (1970-01-01 to xx-xx-2032 I think) –  Carlos Campderrós Apr 12 '11 at 8:58
    
so what is the use of timestamp datatype? s_time field has timestamp datatype. Can't I save 1299762201428 to that field? –  lakumg Apr 12 '11 at 9:00
    
@lakum4stackof: For timestamp datatype, please refer to dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/timestamp.html for detail. –  RollingBoy Apr 12 '11 at 9:03
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Hey there, use the FROM_UNIXTIME() function for this.

Like this:

INSERT INTO table_name
(id,d_id,l_id,connection,s_time,upload_items_count,download_items_count,t_time,status)
VALUES
(1,5,9,'2',FROM_UNIXTIME(1299762201428),5,10,20,'1'), 
(2,5,9,'2',FROM_UNIXTIME(1299762201428),5,10,20,'1')
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Some things to clarify:

  • MySQL timestamp field type is not storing unix timestamps but rather datetime-kind data.
  • UNIX timestamp is a number of regular int type.
  • The timestamp you're talking about is not regular unix timestamp.
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I'm guessing that the field you are trying to save the value in is a datetime field it's not but the same seems to be true for timestamps. If so mysql expects the format to be Year-month-day Hour:minute:second. In order to save the timestamp you will have to convert the field to numeric using a query like

alter table <table_name> change <field> <field> bigint unsigned

If you are using the current time you can use now() or current_timestamp.

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$created_date = date("Y-m-d H:i:s");
$sql = "INSERT INTO $tbl_name(created_date)VALUES('$created_date')";
$result = mysql_query($sql);
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Datatype 'bigint unsigned' may suit this requirement.

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Use FROM_UNIXTIME().

Note: 1299762201428 looks more like a millisecond-timestamp (like Date()*1 in JavaScript), and you probably have to divide that by 1000.

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Use datetime field type. It comes with many advantages like human readability (nobody reads timestamps) and MySQL functions.

To convert from a unix timestamp, you can use MySQL function FROM_UNIXTIME(1299762201428). To convert back you can use UNIX_TIMESTAMP: SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP(t_time) FROM table_name.

Of course, if you don't like MySQL function, you could always use PHP: 'INSERT INTO table_name SET t_time = ' . date('Y-m-d H:i:s', $unix_timestamp).

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The timestamp field type is human readable too (when using SELECT in the console). They are very different and both have their dis/advantages. The main difference is how time zones are being handled. –  Udo G Apr 12 '11 at 9:08
    
@Udo G: You are correct, but I still prefer datetime for various reasons. What is the biggest dis/advantage in your opinion? –  Znarkus Apr 12 '11 at 9:24
    
biggest advantage for timestamp: it better matches the PHP timestamps as it is immune to time zone settings of both the server and the client, whereas datetime changes it's displayed value depending on the time zone of your MySQL client (of course it depends on your project, which one is better). biggest disadvantage for timestamp: it does not support NULL values and (I don't know what they did smoke when they programmed this) a TIMESTAMP NOT NULL field becomes a TIMESTAMP NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP. In my case I unfortunately need to use TIMESTAMP for TZ reasons. –  Udo G Apr 12 '11 at 9:29
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Better is use datatype varchar(15).

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Saving a number in the form of string is usually not a good pratice, for strings are slower in comparison and harder to perform calculation. –  RollingBoy Apr 12 '11 at 9:13
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Check field type in table just save time stamp value in datatype like bigint etc.

Not datetime type

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This should do it:

  $time = new DateTime; 
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You can use now() as well in your query..

i.e "Insert into table (time) values(now()); it use the current tiemstamp

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If I know the database is MySQL, I'll use the NOW() function like this:

INSERT INTO table_name
   (id, name, created_at) 
VALUES 
   (1, 'Gordon', NOW()) 
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If the timestamp is the current time, you could use the mysql NOW() function

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