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i'm using Python 2.5 and Win XP. i have a tuple as below:

>>> a
(None, '{1: 2, 2: 4, 3: 6, 4: 8, 5: 10, 6: 12}')
>>> a[1]
'{1: 2, 2: 4, 3: 6, 4: 8, 5: 10, 6: 12}'
>>> 

i want to convert tuple a[1] to dictionary because i want to use the key and value. pls help to advise. tq

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a is a tuple, a[1] is already a dictionary. For instanche, a[1][4] would give you 8. –  UncleZeiv Apr 12 '11 at 9:33
1  
a[1] is a string, not a dictionary. –  euphoria83 Apr 12 '11 at 9:35
    
Where is this tuple coming from? Are the keys and values always numeric? –  Walter Mundt Apr 12 '11 at 9:36
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
>>> import ast
>>> ast.literal_eval(a[1])
{1: 2, 2: 4, 3: 6, 4: 8, 5: 10, 6: 12}
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i typed import ast but there is error no ast module. –  maximus Apr 12 '11 at 9:42
    
@maximus: there is no ast module in Python2.5. Put ast.py somewhere in your sys.path. –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 12 '11 at 9:44
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First split the string on comma. Iterate over all parts. Split each part on colon. Convert the strings into integers. Add the second integer as value for the first integer as key.

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You've also to remove the brackets before splitting –  Don Apr 12 '11 at 9:49
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If you trust the source of a[1] you can use eval:

dictionary = eval(a[1])

Otherwise you can use json (or simplejson in Python 2.5: see here) :

import json
dictionay = json.loads(a[1])

Note: it mostly depends on how you got the string: if it comes from a repr and cannot be hacked, eval may be good. If it came from json.dumps (which would result in a different string), you should use json.loads.

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This may work, but is dangerous unless you trust the contents of a[1] completely to always have the correct format and never contain malicious data. eval can do pretty much anything given the right string, so if there is ANY chance of a[1] being badly or maliciously generated, DO NOT use eval on it. –  Walter Mundt Apr 12 '11 at 9:38
1  
don't use eval if ast.literal_eval() works. a[1] is not in JSON format. –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 12 '11 at 9:38
    
you are right. a[1] is a string. i just checked it. –  maximus Apr 12 '11 at 9:38
    
i can't import json as it said error no module json. i'm using Python 2.5. but i can use dictionary=eval(a[1]) and it works! great. –  maximus Apr 12 '11 at 9:44
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There is another way to do it, without using any imports.

A simple list comprehension (temp):

>>> a
(None, '{1: 2, 2: 4, 3: 6, 4: 8, 5: 10, 6: 12}')
>>> a[1]
'{1: 2, 2: 4, 3: 6, 4: 8, 5: 10, 6: 12}'
>>> temp = [[int(c) for c in b.split(":")] for b in a[1].strip('{}').split(",")]
>>> a_dict = dict(temp)
>>> a_dict[1]
2
>>> a_dict[2]
4
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1  
You can use a[1].strip('{}') to remove brackets –  Don Apr 12 '11 at 10:17
    
Right, updated the code. –  lecodesportif Apr 12 '11 at 10:19
    
you could use genexpr with the dict constructor: dict(map(int, pair.split(":")) for pair in a[1].strip('{}').split(",")) –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 12 '11 at 12:04
    
Is there any advantage of your expression over dict([[int(c) for c in b.split(":")] for b in a[1].strip('{}').split(",")])? –  lecodesportif Apr 12 '11 at 12:12
1  
there is almost no difference in this case. dict([...]) supports python2.3, creates one additional list, and leaks b, c names into outer scope. dict(map...) might be more/less readable depending on how sensitive you're to excessive punctuation or whether you're familiar with map(). In short the difference is minuscule. –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 12 '11 at 14:57
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The dict() constructor builds dictionaries directly from lists of key-value pairs stored as tuples. When the pairs form a pattern, list comprehensions can compactly specify the key-value list.

dict([('sape', 4139), ('guido', 4127), ('jack', 4098)]) {'sape': 4139, 'jack': 4098, 'guido': 4127} dict([(x, x**2) for x in (2, 4, 6)]) # use a list comprehension {2: 4, 4: 16, 6: 36}

Copy & Paste from: http://docs.python.org/tutorial/datastructures.html

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hi, >>> a (None, '{1: 2, 2: 4, 3: 6, 4: 8, 5: 10, 6: 12}') >>> type(a) <type 'tuple'> >>> a[1] '{1: 2, 2: 4, 3: 6, 4: 8, 5: 10, 6: 12}' >>> type(a[1]) <type 'str'> sorry for the confusion. seems like a[1] is a string type. how would i convert str to dict? tq –  maximus Apr 12 '11 at 9:41
    
Sorry, I overlooked that. Then you're better off with Dons json solution, provided your string-tuple "syntax" is like the one from json –  das_weezul Apr 12 '11 at 9:45
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