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This is a question about some stored procedures running on MSSQL 8 (I think that's SQL Server 2000).

I have two stored procedures left by my predecessor at the company.

The "Modify" window for the first procedure looks something like this:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[Proc1]
    @ID,
    @someBool

AS
BEGIN

SELECT colA, colB, colC
FROM   myTable
WHERE  colA = @ID AND colB = @someBool

END

The second procedure is very similar, being something along the lines of:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[Proc2]
    @ID

AS
BEGIN

SELECT colA, colB
FROM   myTable
WHERE  colA = @ID AND colB = FALSE

END

Obviously, the real procedures are more complicated than this and require a lot more maintenance when changes are made.

Rather than maintaining these two queries separately, which pretty much sucks, I was wondering if there was any way to simply have Proc2 do something along the lines of:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[Proc2]
    @ID

AS
BEGIN

EXEC Proc1(@ID, FALSE)
"drop colC"
"return modified result"

END

Any ideas on the best way to go about this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe something like this?

CREATE TABLE #Proc1TempResults
(
    ColA INT, --OR WHATEVER DATA TYPE
    ColB INT,
    ColC INT
)

INSERT INTO #Proc1TempResults (ColA, ColB, ColC)
EXEC Proc1 @ID, 0

SELECT ColA, ColB
FROM #Proc1TempResults
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I'm getting an error on the first parameter being sent to Proc1. Do I need to add something to Proc1 in order to use its results? –  Frosty840 Apr 12 '11 at 10:50
    
Apologies, see the edited answer above. The syntax was wrong when calling the SP. –  tobias86 Apr 12 '11 at 11:31

The difficulty is that stored procedures are non-relational. Therefore, apart from participating in an Insert statement, they can't be leveraged in other queries; or to borrow some Linq vernacular they are not "composable".

You way want to consider table valued functions (which I believe are available as early as SQL Server 2000))

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