Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So i'm pretty new to mongoDb so i figure this could be a misunderstanding on general usage. so bear with me. I have a document schema I'm working with as such

  { 
    name: "bob", 
    email: "bob@gmail.com", 
    logins: [ 
      { u: 'a', p: 'b', public_id: '123' }, 
      { u: 'x', p: 'y', public_id: 'abc' }
    ] 
  }

My Problem is that i need to ensure that the public ids are unique within a document and collection, Furthermore there are some existing records being migrated from a mySQL DB that dont have records, and will therefore all be replaced by null values in mongo.

I figure its either an index

db.users.ensureIndex({logins.public_id: 1}, {unique: true});

which isn't working because of the missing keys and is throwing a E11000 duplicate key error index:

or this is a more fundamental schema problem in that I shouldn't be nesting objects in an array structure like that. In which case, what? a seperate collection for the user_logins??? which seems to go against the idea of an embedded document.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

If you expect u and p to have always the same values on each insert (as in your example snippet), you might want to use the $addToSet operator on inserts to ensure the uniqueness of your public_id field. Otherwise I think it's quite difficult to make them unique across a whole collection not working with external maintenance or js functions.

If not, I would possibly store them in their own collection and use the public_id as _id field to ensure their cross-document uniqueness inside a collection. Maybe that would contradict the idea of embedded docs in a doc database, but according to different requirements I think that's negligible.

share|improve this answer
    
unfortunatly i worte that wrong. [corrected], I need this to work on inserts and updates. I think $addToSet will only work with updates. Also it needs to be inplemented per query rather than as a database constraint. –  Roon Apr 12 '11 at 10:29
    
@Roon: read up on 'upsert': mongodb.org/display/DOCS/Updating –  Lucas Zamboulis Apr 12 '11 at 10:39
    
Using the upsert condition would also imply making updates, which might be useful to check if the public_id already exists across the nested docs in case of u and p differing. I think there isn't any solution except from storing the nested docs in their own collection and using the _id field or an alternative index to implement the restriction as a db constraint. –  proximus Apr 12 '11 at 10:55
    
I was thinking about something like {'logins': {'$elemMatch': {public_id: {$ne: null}}}} but this doesn't seem to work either as a second part of an index on {logins.public_id: 1} –  Roon Apr 12 '11 at 11:09

Furthermore there are some existing records being migrated from a mySQL DB that dont have records, and will therefore all be replaced by null values in mongo.

So you want to apply a unique index on a data set that's not truly unique. I think this is just a modeling problem.

If logins.public_id is null that's going to violate your uniqueness constraint, then just don't write it at all:

  { 
    logins: [ 
      { u: 'a', p: 'b' }, 
      { u: 'x', p: 'y' }
    ] 
  }
share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks all. In the end I opted to seperate this into 2 collections, one for users and one for logins. users this looked a little like..

   userDocument = {
      ...
      logins: [
        DBRef('loginsCollection', loginDocument._id), 
        DBRef('loginsCollection', loginDocument2._id),       
      ]
    }

   loginDocument = {
       ...
       user: new DBRef('userCollection', userDocument ._id)
    }

Although not what i was originally after (a single collection) It is working niocely and by utilising the MongoId uniquness there is a constraint now built in at a database level and not implemented at the application level.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.