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How to add days to current DateTime using JavaScript. Does JavaScript have a built in function like .Net AddDay?

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16 Answers 16

up vote 195 down vote accepted

A general solution to this question is provided by AnthonyWJones below, whereas this answer will lead to bugs if you assume it works on arbitrary dates. There is no good reason to use this solution as its logic is unclear and it will break in anything but the most simplistic scenarios.

var today = new Date();
var tomorrow = new Date();
tomorrow.setDate(today.getDate()+1);

This will deal with end of months so adding 32 days will work.

Note that this approach fails if the 'from' Date is not in the same year or month as the current Date:

var from = new Date('2010-12-20T00:00:00');
var to = new Date();
to.setDate(from.getDate() + 30); // Tue Nov 19 2013 (WRONG!)
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16  
Why the need to create 2 separate date objects? Why not simply use the same date object: var d = new Date(); d.setDate( d.getDate() + 1 );? –  Joseph Silber Mar 25 '12 at 15:01
47  
For clarity and readability more than anything, sometimes it's easier than explaining or commenting a nondescript line of code. –  OneSHOT Mar 30 '12 at 23:03
8  
If today is not the current date, but coming from somewhere else, make sure to do this: var nextDay = new Date(currentDay) or you will always get the current month. Maybe obvious, but it tripped me up. –  FellowMD Nov 20 '12 at 22:03
9  
This work only if you add day within the current month! If you try any other month, this solution does not work!!! –  sbrbot Dec 3 '12 at 23:41
23  
-1 I can't believe this answer hasn't been updated to var tomorrow = new Date(today); The OP's question is how to "Add days to DateTime using JavaScript" and not "how to get tomorrow's date", which is all this post answers. Alot of people may not realize this is an incomplete answer when they use it and run into bugs down the road. Luckily I caught them early. –  sparebytes Feb 27 '13 at 17:01

You can create one with:-

Date.prototype.addDays = function(days)
{
    var dat = new Date(this.valueOf());
    dat.setDate(dat.getDate() + days);
    return dat;
}

var dat = new Date();

alert(dat.addDays(5))

The problem with using setDate directly is that it's a mutator and that sort of thing is best avoided. ECMA saw fit to treat Date as a mutable class rather than an immutable structure.

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2  
FWIW, the Java Date class works in a similar fashion. Apparently, objects were expensive back in the '90s... –  Shog9 Feb 19 '09 at 0:15
13  
The only answer that works correctly. –  Soul_Master Aug 6 '13 at 7:43
1  
@Soul_Master, I agree. The two highest voted answers fail across year boundaries. –  Drew Noakes Oct 14 '13 at 10:58
    
This is the best answer to this question. The other suggested answers do not work. –  Joe Brunscheon Nov 26 '13 at 16:10
2  
"Don’t Modify Objects You Don’t Own" –  Ogrim Apr 16 at 8:14

The most up-voted answer has fatal flaw

Correct Answer:

function addDays(date, days) {
    var result = new Date(date);
    result.setDate(date.getDate() + days);
    return result;
}

Incorrect Answer by @OneShot:

This answer sometimes provides the correct result but very often returns the wrong year and month. The only time this answer works is when the date that you are adding days to happens to have the current year and month.

// Don't do it this way!
function addDaysWRONG(date, days) {
    var result = new Date();
    result.setDate(date.getDate() + days);
    return result;
}

Proof / Example

Check this JsFiddle

HTML:

<table>
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <th colspan="4">DST Dates</th>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <th>Input</th>
            <th>+1 Day</th>
            <th>+1 Day Fail</th>
            <th>+1 Day DST Fail</th>
        </tr>
        <tr><td>03/10/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>11/03/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>03/09/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>11/02/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>03/08/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>11/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr>
            <th colspan="4">2013</th>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <th>Input</th>
            <th>+1 Day</th>
            <th>+1 Day Fail</th>
            <th>+1 Day DST Fail</th>
        </tr>
        <tr><td>01/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>02/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>03/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>04/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>05/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>06/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>07/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>08/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>09/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>10/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>11/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr><td>12/01/2013</td></tr>
        <tr>
            <th colspan="4">2014</th>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <th>Input</th>
            <th>+1 Day</th>
            <th>+1 Day Fail</th>
            <th>+1 Day DST Fail</th>
        </tr>
        <tr><td>01/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>02/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>03/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>04/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>05/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>06/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>07/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>08/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>09/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>10/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>11/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr><td>12/01/2014</td></tr>
        <tr>
            <th colspan="4">2015</th>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <th>Input</th>
            <th>+1 Day</th>
            <th>+1 Day Fail</th>
            <th>+1 Day DST Fail</th>
        </tr>
        <tr><td>01/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>02/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>03/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>04/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>05/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>06/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>07/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>08/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>09/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>10/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>11/01/2015</td></tr>
        <tr><td>12/01/2015</td></tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

CSS:

body {
    font-size: 14px;
}

table {
    border-collapse:collapse;
}
table, td, th {
    border:1px solid black;
}
td {
    padding: 2px;
}

.wrong {
    color: red;
}
.right {
    color: green;
}
.answer {
    font-weight: bold;
}

JavaScript:

// Correct
function addDays(date, days) {
    var result = new Date(date);
    result.setDate(date.getDate() + days);
    return result;
}

// Bad Year/Month
function addDaysWRONG(date, days) {
    var result = new Date();
    result.setDate(date.getDate() + days);
    return result;
}

// Bad during DST
function addDaysDstFail(date, days) {
    var dayms = (days * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000);
    return new Date(date.getTime() + dayms);    
}

// TEST
function formatDate(date) {
    return (date.getMonth() + 1) + '/' + date.getDate() + '/' + date.getFullYear();
}

$('tbody tr td:first-child').each(function () {
    var $in = $(this);
    var $out = $('<td/>').insertAfter($in).addClass("answer");
    var $outFail = $('<td/>').insertAfter($out);
    var $outDstFail = $('<td/>').insertAfter($outFail);
    var date = new Date($in.text());
    var correctDate = formatDate(addDays(date, 1));
    var failDate = formatDate(addDaysWRONG(date, 1));
    var failDstDate = formatDate(addDaysDstFail(date, 1));

    $out.text(correctDate);
    $outFail.text(failDate);
    $outDstFail.text(failDstDate);
    $outFail.addClass(correctDate == failDate ? "right" : "wrong");
    $outDstFail.addClass(correctDate == failDstDate ? "right" : "wrong");
});
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6  
It really saddens me that an answer with over 100 votes and 100k views has serious bugs and remains to be corrected after numerous comments and rejected edits on the most renowned programming help website there is. –  sparebytes Oct 30 '13 at 18:58
    
Same as this one right? –  bzlm Oct 30 '13 at 19:26
    
@bzlm, Yes essentially the same. It just doesn't modify the Date prototype. I also wanted to point out the flaws in the main answer. –  sparebytes Oct 30 '13 at 19:27
    
The accepted answer was edited a fortnight ago to point out its flaws. Do you think it needs further editing? If so, how? –  bzlm Oct 30 '13 at 19:33
    
@bzlm: Yes, I believe the note should read "this approach fails if the 'from' date is not in the same year or month as the current date". I still worry that users will glance over the answer and not read the warning since it doesn't stand out. Thanks. –  sparebytes Oct 30 '13 at 19:40
var today = new Date();
var tomorrow = new Date();
tomorrow.setDate(today.getDate()+1);

Be careful, because this can be tricky. When setting "tomorrow", it only works because it's current value matches the year and month for "today". However, setting to a date number like "32" normally will still work just fine to move it to the next month.

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6  
The accepted answer to this question looks strangely familiar. Curious. I guess I'll put my +1 here. –  Tomalak Feb 19 '09 at 0:59
1  
Yeah? But WTF is this? (ran on March 31st, 2010): today = new Date(); tomorrow = new Date(); tomorrow.setDate(today.getDate()+1); alert(tomorrow.getMonth()); Says "3". alert(tomorrow); is correct... Why??? –  d-_-b Mar 31 '10 at 2:44
5  
@sims month is 0 indexed. Month 3 is April –  Joel Coehoorn Mar 31 '10 at 3:26
2  
@oneshot - the edit still came before your answer –  Joel Coehoorn May 24 '11 at 14:13
3  
This approach doesn't work across years. If your starting date is from a few years ago, getDate() returns the day of that year. Then, calling setDate sets the day in the current year. So it is NOT a good general solution. @AnthonyWJones's answer actually works correctly. –  Drew Noakes Oct 14 '13 at 10:55

My solution is:

nextday=new Date(oldDate.getFullYear(),oldDate.getMonth(),oldDate.getDate()+1);

this solution does not have problem with daylight saving. Here you can add/sub time offsets for years, months, days etc. Offsets can be any numbers;

someday=new Date(oldDate.getFullYear()-2,oldDate.getMonth()+22,oldDate.getDate()+61);

is correct code.

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4  
Note: this resets time to 00:00:00 (can be an issue or not) –  Álvaro G. Vicario Feb 20 '13 at 11:45
    
+1 for me time isn't an issue, ta –  Rippo Jun 13 '13 at 9:02
    
Doesn't work on the last day of any month, as you say. Makes this unusable on 12 days of the year. Sounds like a nightmare to debug!!! –  Drew Noakes Oct 14 '13 at 10:59
1  
No Drew, it is usable for all days on year. You can put date offset bigger than 31 or month offset bigger than 12 and this function will recalculate it as day in next month or month in next year. So for example: nextday=new Date(oldDate.getFullYear(),oldDate.getMonth(),oldDate.getDate()+40); is perfectly well code. –  sbrbot Nov 11 '13 at 7:30
    
Thank you! I cannot believe how many poorly thought out "answers" have been given lots of votes. Yours is the first to provide something that can be extended to other uses than just "find tomorrow's date". –  xtempore Dec 12 '13 at 23:16

Try

var someDate = new Date();
var duration = 2; //In Days
someDate.setTime(someDate.getTime() +  (duration * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000));

Using setDate() to add a date wont solve your problem, try adding some days to a Feb month, if you try to add new days to it, it wont result in what you expected.

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+1 This should be marked as the correct answer –  Crackerjack Dec 18 '12 at 18:49
13  
No, this should not be marked as the correct answer since this solution assumes that every day has 24*60*60*1000 seconds but it does not (daylight saving)! –  sbrbot Jan 12 '13 at 9:06
    
Any evidence about the 'Feb' problem with setDate()? Is it this: stackoverflow.com/questions/5497637/… –  nobar Feb 4 '13 at 3:21
    
This doesn't work with daylight saving time. –  1365 Mar 2 '13 at 19:05

I created these extensions last night:
you can pass either positive or negative values;

example:

var someDate = new Date();
var expirationDate = someDate.addDays(10);
var previous = someDate.addDays(-5);


Date.prototype.addDays = function (num) {
    var value = this.valueOf();
    value += 86400000 * num;
    return new Date(value);
}

Date.prototype.addSeconds = function (num) {
    var value = this.valueOf();
    value += 1000 * num;
    return new Date(value);
}

Date.prototype.addMinutes = function (num) {
    var value = this.valueOf();
    value += 60000 * num;
    return new Date(value);
}

Date.prototype.addHours = function (num) {
    var value = this.valueOf();
    value += 3600000 * num;
    return new Date(value);
}

Date.prototype.addMonths = function (num) {
    var value = new Date(this.valueOf());

    var mo = this.getMonth();
    var yr = this.getYear();

    mo = (mo + num) % 12;
    if (0 > mo) {
        yr += (this.getMonth() + num - mo - 12) / 12;
        mo += 12;
    }
    else
        yr += ((this.getMonth() + num - mo) / 12);

    value.setMonth(mo);
    value.setYear(yr);
    return value;
}
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3  
The .addDays() method does not work for dates that cross daylight saving time boundaries. –  mskfisher Apr 29 '13 at 0:02

These answers seem confusing to me, I prefer:

var ms = new Date().getTime() + 86400000;
var tomorrow = new Date(ms);

getTime() gives us milliseconds since 1970, and 86400000 is the number of milliseconds in a day. Hence, ms contains milliseconds for the desired date.

Using the millisecond constructor gives the desired date object.

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25  
This solution doesn't take daylight savings into account. So, for example, this will return the same date, 23 hours later: new Date(new Date('11/4/2012').getTime() + 86400000) –  Noah Miller Mar 20 '12 at 14:55
1  
@NoahMiller The problem which you bring up could be a feature not a bug! Adding 24 hours per day is sometimes the right thing to do, with the goal of knowing the resulting time based on DST. The date that your example returns has a time value of 11pm on November 4th which is what 24 hours later is on that particular day. The original poster asked about datetime which would seem to indicate some desire for correct times of the day. This answer is correct if you are in the case when your goal is the time 24 hours later. –  Andy Novocin Jun 23 at 15:12
    
I agree Noah, var d2 = new Date(d1.valueOf() + 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000) does what it says, adds a full day worth of ticks to a date. –  Corey Alix Jul 18 at 16:44

Just spent ages trying to work out what the deal was with the year not adding when following the lead examples below.

If you want to just simply add n days to the date you have you are best to just go:

myDate.setDate(myDate.getDate() + n);

or the longwinded version

var theDate = new Date(2013, 11, 15);
var myNewDate = new Date(theDate);
myNewDate.setDate(myNewDate.getDate() + 30);
console.log(myNewDate);

This today/tommorrow stuff is confusing. By setting the current date into your new date variable you will mess up the year value. if you work from the original date you won't.

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Thanks Jason for your answer that works as expected, here is a mix from your code and the handy format of AnthonyWJones :

Date.prototype.addDays = function(days){
    var ms = new Date().getTime() + (86400000 * days);
    var added = new Date(ms);
    return added;
}
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4  
It does not take into account daylight saving when there's more or less than 86400000 seconds in a day and can result in logical error (program bug) in your code. –  sbrbot Jan 12 '13 at 9:08
    
Sometimes that's needed. The eBay API has x-day auctions which are 24-hour based so your item will end at a different time than it goes up if DST status changes mid-auction. In that case you need to use this type of function to avoid logical errors. –  Andy Novocin Jun 23 at 15:17

The mozilla docs for setDate() don't indicate that it will handle end of month scenarios. See https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Date

setDate()

  • Sets the day of the month (1-31) for a specified date according to local time.

That is why I use setTime() when I need to add days.

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I would link to the ECMAScript docs, but they are released in PDF ;( –  Blake Mills Sep 28 '12 at 20:37

If you can, use moment.js. JavaScript doesn't have very good native date/time methods. http://momentjs.com/docs/#/manipulating/add/

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    //the_day is 2013-12-31
    var the_day = Date.UTC(2013, 11, 31); 
    // Now, the_day will be "1388448000000" in UTC+8; 
    var the_next_day = new Date(the_day + 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000);
    // Now, the_next_day will be "Wed Jan 01 2014 08:00:00 GMT+0800"
share|improve this answer
    
I believe this wouldn't work with daylight saving times, leap seconds, or other timezone changes causing a day to not have 86400s. –  Nicolas Cortot Dec 28 '13 at 16:29

I've used this approach to get the right date in one line to get the time plus one day following what people were saying above.

((new Date()).setDate((new Date()).getDate()+1))

I just figured I would build off a normal (new Date()):

(new Date()).getDate()
> 21

Using the code above I can now set all of that within Date() in (new Date()) and it behaves normally.

(new Date(((new Date()).setDate((new Date()).getDate()+1)))).getDate()
> 22

or to get the Date object:

(new Date(((new Date()).setDate((new Date()).getDate()+1))))
share|improve this answer

I use something like:

new Date(dateObject.getTime() + amountOfDays * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000)

Works with day saving time:

new Date(new Date(2014, 2, 29, 20, 0, 0).getTime() + 1 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000)

Works with new year:

new Date(new Date(2014, 11, 31, 20, 0, 0).getTime() + 1 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000)

It can be parametrized:

function DateAdd(source, amount, step) {
  var factor = 1;
  if (step == "day") factor = 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000;
  else if (step == "hour") factor = 60 * 60 * 1000;
  ...
  new Date(source.getTime() + amount * factor);
}
share|improve this answer

the same answer: How to add number of days to today's date?

    function DaysOfMonth(nYear, nMonth) {
        switch (nMonth) {
            case 0:     // January
                return 31; break;
            case 1:     // February
                if ((nYear % 4) == 0) {
                    return 29;
                }
                else {
                    return 28;
                };
                break;
            case 2:     // March
                return 31; break;
            case 3:     // April
                return 30; break;
            case 4:     // May
                return 31; break;
            case 5:     // June
                return 30; break;
            case 6:     // July
                return 31; break;
            case 7:     // August
                return 31; break;
            case 8:     // September
                return 30; break;
            case 9:     // October
                return 31; break;
            case 10:     // November
                return 30; break;
            case 11:     // December
                return 31; break;
        }
    };

    function SkipDate(dDate, skipDays) {
        var nYear = dDate.getFullYear();
        var nMonth = dDate.getMonth();
        var nDate = dDate.getDate();
        var remainDays = skipDays;
        var dRunDate = dDate;

        while (remainDays > 0) {
            remainDays_month = DaysOfMonth(nYear, nMonth) - nDate;
            if (remainDays > remainDays_month) {
                remainDays = remainDays - remainDays_month - 1;
                nDate = 1;
                if (nMonth < 11) { nMonth = nMonth + 1; }
                else {
                    nMonth = 0;
                    nYear = nYear + 1;
                };
            }
            else {
                nDate = nDate + remainDays;
                remainDays = 0;
            };
            dRunDate = Date(nYear, nMonth, nDate);
        }
        return new Date(nYear, nMonth, nDate);
    };
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3  
You'll need to update your leap year check - if the year is divisible by 100 and not by 400, it's not a leap year (2000 was; 2100 won't be) –  andrewsi Oct 5 '12 at 16:38

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