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Despite that the HTML4 standard states there is no default for the <script> element, looks like browsers assume "text/javascript" by default. How safe is this assumption?

To Standards Nazis: I know this is something to raise an eyebrow upon, but I believe there is nothing wrong in exploiting some de facto standards for the sake of readability and succinctness (e.g. omitting quotes around simple attribute values, etc).

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Standards Nazis? Really? Way to encourage people who think standards are important to give you a considered response. You should get your facts straight too, quote marks are explicitly (in the standard) optional around attribute values consisting only of certain characters in HTML 4. –  Quentin Apr 12 '11 at 11:41
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possible duplicate of HTML5 <script> declarations –  Quentin Apr 12 '11 at 11:44
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Perhaps I am a "Standards Nazi" but I think it's a bit silly to omit a relatively small amount of code that guarantees your code will work in relatively any browser simply for the sake of readability and succinctness. Also I personally find unquoted HTML attributes to be a real eyesore and makes the code smell of Dreamweaver and Frontpage :) –  Andrew Hare Apr 12 '11 at 11:47
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@David Dorward I consider myself a Grammar Nazi for the languages I know well, so there was nothing offensive anyway, but for me personally de facto, real-world standards are more valuable than those produced by committees. –  mojuba Apr 12 '11 at 11:51
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You might not have intended offense, but that doesn't stop the term being offensive to a lot of people. –  Quentin Apr 12 '11 at 12:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

HTML5 now doesn't require the mimetype to be declared in a script tag, as "text/javascript" is implied; so yes, I think it's safe to assume that this is the default.

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As of HTML5 then text/javascript is the standard when no type is specified.

Personally however, I'd be inclined to always specify type - better safe than sorry!

Additionally, I'd always advise writing code under the assumption that someone else will have to support it. Do you think the next person along will thank you for your 'time-saving' solutions that make the code harder to follow? I very much doubt it ;)

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+1 Better to be safe :) –  Andrew Hare Apr 12 '11 at 11:48

From experience i know that it isn't safe to make this assumption.

However, the HTML5 standard does describe this standard value for the language attribute being "text/javascript".

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What browser did you find that defaulted to not-JavaScript for script elements, and what did it default to? –  Quentin Apr 12 '11 at 11:45
    
I don't remember exactly, but it probably was IE6 that didn't execute the script at all. –  Richard Tuin Apr 12 '11 at 11:57
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IE6 is quite happy without a type attribute. –  Quentin Apr 12 '11 at 12:03
    
Okay, then it probably was another browser, but i've come across it. Personally i wouldn't omit this attribute to avoid breaking compatibility with whatever browser just for readability or bandwidth saving. –  Richard Tuin Apr 12 '11 at 12:08

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