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I have been making Tetris game and it's almost complete. I have a problem with KeyEvents and a Timer.

My Timer calls actionPerformed every 400ms which drops down tetris block. Problem is that if I press something from the keyboard (down, left, right etc), those commands are noted also every 400 milliseconds. How can I make the timer call actionPerformed every 400ms but so that I can press whenever and how many times I want something from the keyboard and it's instantly recognized/responded to?

EDIT: Here's some of code like people asked

public class Game extends JPanel implements ActionListener {

public static final HashMap<Character, Color> colors = new HashMap<Character,Color>();
Timer timer;
Block kpl;
Grid gameBoard;
char[][] grid;
boolean paused = false;

public Game() {

    colors.put('P', Color.blue); colors.put('S', Color.green);
    colors.put('D', Color.pink); colors.put('L', Color.red);
    colors.put('Z', Color.orange); colors.put('A', Color.cyan);
    colors.put('T', Color.magenta);
    kpl = new Block();
    gameBoard = new Grid(21,10); // 21x10 sized gameboard
    grid = gameBoard.getGrid();
    addKeyListener(new KeyListening());
    setDoubleBuffered(true);
    setFocusable(true);
    timer = new Timer(100, this);
    timer.start();

}

@Override
public void paint(Graphics g) { // draws the current game situation
    super.paint(g);

        int height = getHeight()/grid.length;
        int width = getWidth()/grid[0].length/2;


        for (int row = 0; row < grid.length; ++row) {
            for (int column = 0; column < grid[row].length; ++column) {

                if (grid[row][column] == '.') { // if empty, paint white
                    g.setColor(Color.white);
                    g.fillRect(column*width, row*height , width, height);
                    g.setColor(Color.LIGHT_GRAY);
                    g.drawRect(column*width, row*height , width, height);
                }
                else if (grid[row][column] != '.') { // if not empty, paint with the color of the block
                    g.setColor(colors.get(grid[row][column]));
                    g.fillRect(column*width, row*height , width, height);
                    g.setColor(Color.BLACK);
                    g.drawRect(column*width, row*height , width, height);
                }
            }
        }

    Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().sync();
    g.dispose();
}



public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
    if (!gameBoard.isFallingBlock())
        gameBoard.drop(kpl); // if not any falling blocks, drops a new block

    gameBoard.updateView(); // moves the block down
    repaint();
}

    private class KeyListening extends KeyAdapter {

    @Override
    public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {

        int key = e.getKeyCode();

        switch (key) {
            case KeyEvent.VK_LEFT:
                gameBoard.move("v"); // moves block left
                break;
            case KeyEvent.VK_RIGHT:
                gameBoard.move("o"); // moves block right
                break;
            case KeyEvent.VK_DOWN:
                gameBoard.updateView(); // moves block down
                break;
            case KeyEvent.VK_SPACE:
                gameBoard.move("p"); // drops the block to the bottom
                break;
            case KeyEvent.VK_UP: // rotates block
                gameBoard.move("k");
                break;
            case KeyEvent.VK_P: // makes the game pause
                if (paused) {
                    timer.start();
                    paused = false;
                    return;
                }

                timer.stop();
                paused = true;
                break;

        }

    }

}

}

Had to translate the variables a little since I have been naming them with my own language. GUI is also pretty simple since I made first a text version of my Tetris so it basically runs the text version of it in the background and just paints the situation of the game.

Text version itself is char typed matrix where I move the blocks, for example:

..P..
..ppp
.....
.....

SOLVED:

Problem solved! In public void keyPressed() after every command coming from keyboard I just called repaint()-method again like

        public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {

        int key = e.getKeyCode();
        switch (key) {
            case KeyEvent.VK_LEFT:
                gameBoard.move("v");
                repaint();
                break;

Originally my game responded to my keyboard commands instantly but drew the current state of game every 400ms in actionPerformed() where the repaint() was called. Now my blocks can be moved whenever I want without any "delay" and they're still dropping steady every 400ms :)

share|improve this question
    
Not enough information to solve this problem. That shouldn't happen. You'll have to give more information about what is happening with the KeyEvents, e.g. show a snippet of code. –  Robin Green Apr 12 '11 at 11:49
    
can you please post code here, so that we have clear idea!! –  Dead Programmer Apr 12 '11 at 11:50
    
You haven't posted all your code. It could be a event getting delayed problem, or a repaint getting delayed problem. Can you find out which problem it is by putting a System.out.println at the top of keyPressed(KeyEvent e)? –  Robin Green Apr 12 '11 at 16:31
    
Sorry for this trouble but what do I need to put inside the System.out.println()? Or do you really mean just println() without parameters? If so, what to do with it? And that's the all of the code of Game class but of course there are still more classes where the game logic is located at. EDIT: When I set the timer to 1000ms and spammed my block move to the left, it printed println() in time but took action with that 1000ms delay. Don't know if this is what you meant but just in case wrote it here –  Kenny Roberts Apr 12 '11 at 21:28

3 Answers 3

You need to make sure you are using a Swing Timer and are not blocking the Event Dispatching Thread. More than likely you need a separate actionPerformed method to handle the key events than the block drops.

share|improve this answer

You may want to take a look at Key Bindings and its examples at the bottom of that same page.

Taken from tips4java blog:

Add new functionality by adding a new key binding:

Action action = new AbstractAction() {...};
String keyStrokeAndKey = "control Z";
KeyStroke keyStroke = KeyStroke.getKeyStroke(keyStrokeAndKey);
component.getInputMap(...).put(keyStroke, keyStrokeAndKey);
component.getActionMap().put(keyStrokeAndKey, action);

Change existing functionality by replacing the Action of an existing binding:

Action action = new AbstractAction() {...};
KeyStroke keyStroke = KeyStroke.getKeyStroke("control Z");
InputMap im = component.getInputMap(...);
component.getActionMap().put(im.get(keyStroke), action);

Share an Action with a different KeyStroke:

KeyStroke existingKeyStroke = KeyStroke.getKeyStroke("ENTER");
KeyStroke addedKeyStroke = KeyStroke.getKeyStroke("control Z");
InputMap im = component.getInputMap(...);
im.put(addedKeyStroke, im.get(existingKeyStroke));

Remove a key binding:

KeyStroke remove = KeyStroke.getKeyStroke(...);
InputMap im =component.getInputMap(...);
im.put(remove, "none");

Note, the above examples are for adding bindings to individual components. To add a binding at the frame or dialog level you need to use the InputMap and ActionMap of the root pane:

frame.getRootPane().getInputMap(JComponent.WHEN_ANCESTOR_OF_FOCUSED_COMPONENT)...
frame.getRootPane().getActionMap()...
share|improve this answer

I'd try decreasing the timer interval to make keypresses more responsive and use a counter to drop down the block once every so many intervals.

share|improve this answer
    
This is just a hack which doesn't address the real problem. –  Robin Green Apr 12 '11 at 12:43
    
@Robin This isn't a hack at all! In fact, most games (including yes, Tetris) operate in this manner. I would go as far as to say the asker's 'solution' is the true hack. Repainting the game screen each keypress, ack. –  epaik Apr 13 '11 at 20:14
    
This is not programming on a ZX Spectrum. I imagine the computer is quite capable of repainting the screen on every keypress. –  Robin Green Apr 14 '11 at 10:59

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