Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Rather than something like this:

switch (id) {
case 2:
case 5:
case 11:
case 15:
...
}

Is there a concise way to check if an int variable is equal to any one of a series of integers? Maybe something like if (id == {2|5|11|15}) ...?

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You could put all the ints into a HashSet and do a contains.

Hashset<int> ids = new HashSet<int>() {...initialize...};

if(ids.Contains(id)){
...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks... never used a Hashset. After a bit of searching, turns out they're AWESOME (cause they're fast). vcskicks.com/hashset.php – Chaddeus Apr 12 '11 at 11:54
1  
In the case you are talking about with the checking for certain values you'd have to do some testing when compared to the switch statement as far as performance. They should be relatively close but the HashSet is probably slightly slower. Also be careful about the birthday problem. Eric Lippert explains it nicely here: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/03/22/… – Craig Suchanec Apr 12 '11 at 11:56
    
Thanks... in this case I just wanted to check if a given int was one that was contained in those few numbers. It won't scale any larger. Thanks for leading me to HashSets, much appreciated. – Chaddeus Apr 12 '11 at 12:00
1  
@Chad, @Craig: incidentally, the compiler will itself generate a hash table to codegen the switch if it believes that doing so will make the switch code faster and smaller. – Eric Lippert Apr 12 '11 at 14:27
    
Thanks Eric, that's a great insight into this; I really appreciate your addition to this topic. – Chaddeus Apr 13 '11 at 0:14
if((new List<int> { 2, 5, 11, 15}).Contains(id))

But you probably don't want to create a new List instance every time, so it would be better to create it in the constructor of your class.

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe if it were if((new HashSet<int> {2,5,11,15}).Contains(id)){...} it would be performant? vcskicks.com/hashset.php – Chaddeus Apr 12 '11 at 11:55
1  
With that few elements, there won't be any difference in performance. The problem is the creation of the object, not the search. – Daniel Hilgarth Apr 12 '11 at 12:10
    
Good point... lol, would not be an issue with that few elements... guess I got my mind stuck in "pure performance" mode again... thanks. – Chaddeus Apr 12 '11 at 13:52

You could try:

List<int> ints = new List<int> {2, 5, 11, 15};
if (ints.Contains(id))
{
}

Though it might be slower than doing the switch.

However, it does have the advantage that (assuming that you initialise the list from data) you can use this to check on any list of integer values and aren't constrained to hard coded values.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it would work. I like the Hashset a bit better because it performs better than List<>. Appreciate your answer though. – Chaddeus Apr 12 '11 at 11:54
1  
@Chad - no problem. My point about not having hard coded values is still relevant though.... – ChrisF Apr 12 '11 at 11:55
    
correct, I appreciate the addition. – Chaddeus Apr 12 '11 at 12:00

If your goal is to be concise.

//
(new []{2, 5, 11, 15}).Contains(id)
//

If you want to be fast probably stick with the switch.

I think I like the HashSet though.

share|improve this answer
    
If they were sorted, you might as well make that: Array.BinarySearch(new[] { ... }, id) != -1 – user7116 Apr 12 '11 at 12:35

Perhaps a solution using LINQ:

List<int> ints = new List<int> {2, 5, 11, 15};

void Search(int s) {
    int result = ints.Where(x => x == s).FirstOrDefault();
}
share|improve this answer

You can do something like this:

    bool exist = List.Init(6, 8, 2, 9, 12).Contains(8);

    foreach (int i in List.Init(6, 8, 2, 9, 12))
    {
        Console.WriteLine(i.ToString());
    }



    public class List : IEnumerable<int>
    {
        private int[] _values;

        public List(params int[] values)
        {
            _values = values;
        }

        public static List Init(params int[] values)
        {
            return new List(values);
        }

        public IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator()
        {
            foreach (int value in _values)
            {
                yield return value;
            }
        }

        public bool Contains(int value)
        {
            return Array.IndexOf(_values, value) > -1;
        }

        System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        {
            return GetEnumerator();
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.