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When I run Setup() I expect to see a 't' in my console, followed by multiple 'x' characters. However it returns just multiple 't' chars. It's like my retrn never gets overwrited. Please see codesample below:

class Returner
{
    public:
        Returner(){}

        char test()
        {
        }
};

class TReturner: public Returner
{
    public:
        TReturner(){}

        char test()
        {
            return 't';
        }
};

class XReturner: public Returner
{
    public:
        XReturner(){}

        char test()
        {
            return 'x';
        }
};

void setup()
{
    Serial.begin(9600);

    TReturner t = TReturner();
    Returner * retrn = &t;

    while(1)
    {
        Serial.print( retrn.test());

        XReturner x = XReturner();
        retrn = &x;

        _delay_ms(500);
    }
}
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There are multiple issues with this code. First of all, the base class char test() should be virtual. You are also not returning any value from this function, where are you specified return type as char. Next, statements like XReturner x = XReturner(); are tottaly unnecessary. You can simply do ` XReturner x;`. I suggest you to read a good C++ book before proceeding further. –  Asha Apr 12 '11 at 12:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I can't 100% explain that behaviour - I'd expect you wouldn't get any characters printed as it'd be using Returner::test - but if you're overriding a function in C++ you need to declare it virtual in the base class:

class Returner 
{
  public:   
    Returner(){}
    virtual char test()
    {    
    }
};

Without test being virtual, the line

Serial.print( retrn.test() );

(don't you mean retrn->test()?) will just pick one implementation of test and use it always. As above I'd expect this to be the empty Returner::test(). You may also either need to make Returner::test abstract

    virtual char test() = 0;

or return some value if you're leaving it with a function body.

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Thanks! I forgot "virtual" indeed. And ofcourse I also meant "retrn->test()" ;) –  Marc Apr 12 '11 at 12:56

setup() will be called once by the bootloader. (do not create an infinite loop inside of it)
You should define a loop() function, it too will be called by the bootloader an 'infinite' number of times.

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