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I wanted to play a little bit with lambdas and for each(Range-based for-loop, not STL for_each) in C++0x. So i went to wiki and tried to rewrite examples from wiki using lambdas:

    std::vector<int> some_list;
some_list.push_back(42);
some_list.push_back(37);
int total = 0;
int value = 5;
for(int& x:some_list)
{
    [](int x)
    {
        cout << "xL=" <<x <<endl;
    };
}

for(auto x:some_list)
    cout<< "x="<<x<<endl;

    return result;
}

Problem is that I don't see any cout in the lambda version, for each version prints x nicely... I presume that it is impossible to mix for each and lambdas because lambdas can only be in the place of the "functions", and cannot act as loop body, but I'm not sure, so if somebody can confirm it would be cool

compiler: GCC 4.6

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Please show us the complete source code. –  Klaim Apr 12 '11 at 15:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should do a call to operator() on the lambda itself.

for(int& x:some_list)
{
    [](int x)
    {
        cout << "xL=" <<x <<endl;
    }(x);  //notice the "()"
}
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Tnx, but it still does not compile...error: no match for call to ‘(main(int, char**)::<lambda(int)>) ()’ : note: candidates are: confused by earlier errors, bailing out –  NoSenseEtAl Apr 12 '11 at 14:02
2  
This lambda requires an argument to be called. –  Klaim Apr 12 '11 at 15:20
1  
cool, tnx ,its one of those things that are "oh, doh" when somebody tells you how to do it, but you could never figure it out by yourself. –  NoSenseEtAl Apr 12 '11 at 17:57
2  
What's the point in that? You might as well add another nested lambda inside. [](int x) { [](int x) { cout << "x=" << x <<endl; }(x); }(x); –  Motti Apr 12 '11 at 19:15

In the first "for" you only create lambda-function, not call it.

Actually lambda-function doesn't seem to be useful here - you may just write the code. But if you want to use lambda anyway, add "()" after "}".

It's useful in another situation - when std::for_each is used.

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You're using a regular for loop it doesn't expect a lambda. The curly braces are just a code block so what you're doing is defining the lambda for each iteration but not invoking it.

What you want to do is use std::for_each.

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