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I have a class that uses either a static list (firstFriend in the example) or a dynamic list (secondFriend in the example) for initialization. The list functionality I didn't want to write for the example because it is not important. The key problem is that the firstFriend and the secondFriend are, well, friends. The code of the constructors of the class "target" is the same: if I overload the constructors I'm duplicating exactly the same code. I cannot template the constructors because it doesn't work.

Here's the example (NOTE: the firstFriend and secondFriend may look the same, but they are NOT the same in the ACTUAL code, this is just a heavily reduced model, the differences between their attributes and functionality does not make any differrence in the "target" class constructor because the parts of the public interface is used from both classes that are exactly the same):

template <class T>
class firstFriend 
{
    public:
    firstFriend() {};

    firstFriend(const T& t) {};

    private:
    T tAttribute; 
};


template <class T>
class secondFriend 
{
    public:

    secondFriend() {};

    secondFriend(T t) : tAttribute(t) {};

    friend class firstFriend<T>;

    private:

        T tAttribute;
};

class target
{
    public:
    target(const firstFriend<int>&) 
    {
        // Some nice initialization of the TargetData.
    }
    target(const secondFriend<int>&)
    {
        // Exactly the same initialization as above. 
        // To the single character. 
    }; 
    private:
    firstFriend<int> TargetData;
};

Question: how do I overload constructors without writing (copy/paste-ing) the same code twice? I have tried templating the constructors, but it didn't work. Implicit cast maybe? What would be the most efficient way (the firstFriend and secondFriend are HUGE lists of data). Thanks in advance!

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1  
How did you attempt to template the methods? If it's exactly the same code a template should just work. Can you show us the code in the constructors? The part taht is exactly the same? –  wheaties Apr 12 '11 at 13:17
    
I believe templating the constructors should work. If you template it to reference to anything, it should work. If you try to mention the <int>, you'd have to use the quite tricky template with template argument syntax, but you shouldn't need to do that. –  Jan Hudec Apr 12 '11 at 13:21
    
Well, I just templated the constructor like you have just described, and it compiles perfectly, but then the linker fails on me when I try to use the library within an application. The codes are exactly the same, exactly. The "firstFriend" is a dynamical linked list, and the "secondFriend" ist a statical array, the only method used is the "[]" access operator, which is the same for both classes (on top of that, they are friends). –  tmaric Apr 12 '11 at 13:28
    
@tomislav-maric Did you place the templated code in the .cc file instead of within the header? That would cause the linker error. All templated code of a class has to be found within the header. –  wheaties Apr 12 '11 at 13:38
    
@wheaties I have a header with the declaration of the class, and there I have the declaration of the templated constructor, and a .c file with the definition of the class public and private interface, where again I have the template<class T> above the constructor. –  tmaric Apr 12 '11 at 13:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If both constructors have exactly same code, then you can write a constructor template as:

template<class FriendType >
target(const FriendType &) 
{
    // Some nice initialization of the TargetData.
}

If there is a little difference, but most of the code is same, then you can write an init template function, and call it from both constructors as:

  target(const firstFriend<int>& arg) 
  {
     init(arg);
     //other code
  }
  target(const secondFriend<int>& arg)
  {
     init(arg);
     //other code
  }
private:
  template<class FriendType >
  void init(const FriendType &) 
  {
     //common code
  }
share|improve this answer
    
I wanted to call a constructor from within a constructor, found out that it cannot be done in C++ and then I found this "init function" approach, this is then the best way? Thanks a lot! Templating the constructor didn't work. I'll try it again, maybe I did something wrong somewhere.. –  tmaric Apr 12 '11 at 13:33
    
@tomislav: templating the constructor do work normally, however in the call to the constructor you need to explicitly precise the template arguments, which is why functions like make_pair exist in the STL. –  Matthieu M. Apr 12 '11 at 13:40
    
@Matthieu M. I just wrote the same thing above... ^^ The code that I'm using is for numerical mathematics, it was developed in parallel with C++ so the containers are not from stl... although some of the functionality has been modified to work with stl. I will check out the make_pair! :) –  tmaric Apr 12 '11 at 13:45

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