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C++ overload resolution
Why does an overridden function in the derived class hide other overloads of the base class?

Why the following example:

class A {
    public:
        void f(int x){ }
};

class B : public A {
    public:
        void f(float a, int b){ }
};

int main(){
    B *b = new B;
    b->f(1);
};

causes:

test.cpp: In function ‘int main()’: test.cpp:13: error: no matching function for call to ‘B::f(int)’ test.cpp:8: note: candidates are: void B::f(float, int)

f(int) and f(float, int) have different signatures. Why is it causing an error?

EDIT

I understand it's hiding. I am asking why is this happening?

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marked as duplicate by Georg Fritzsche, Potatoswatter, Prasoon Saurav, Mike Seymour, Tadeusz Kopec Apr 12 '11 at 14:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I guess it is hiding because B::f and A:f are in different scope. –  pic11 Apr 12 '11 at 13:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Essentially, you are not overloading the base class method; by redefining method f, you are hiding the base class method. You can prevent this by including it explicitly into the child class scope the following:

class B : public A {
    public:
        using A::f;
        void f(float a, int b){ }
};
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Why are you hiding it? Is it simply a rule or is there some reason for compiler to work like this? –  gruszczy Apr 12 '11 at 13:53
2  
@gruszczy It’s a rule. It does make sense when the base class is later changed and introduces a new method of the same name as a derived class method. This in turn could lead to the new method being called in places in the client code where the old method was intended to be called. Essentially, this rule thus ensures backwards maintainability of code where base class interfaces are subject to being extended. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 12 '11 at 13:57

By declaring another function named 'f' in your class B, you are hiding the 'f' declared in A.

To get overloading to work along with inheritance, add a using directive to your class B.

class B : public A {
public:
    using A::f;
    void f(float a, int b){ }
};

This is because compiler looks in the scope of class B and finds only one method that it has to consider for overload resolution.

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A::f is hidden by B:f. Use using directive to overload base class method.

class B : public A {
    public:
        using A::f;
        void f(float a, int b){ }
};
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void f(float a, int b){ } defined in the derived class hides void f(int x){ } in the base class.

Why?

Read this answer.

Solution

 using A::f; // add this above f's definition in the derived class
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