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My question is: (is the above|what is) the right way to create a non intrusive front-end?

I am explaining my problem with a simplified example.

I have a back-end implementing a binary tree:

// Back-end
struct Node
{
  Label label;
  Node* r, l;
};

I would like now to implement the front-end to print the tree graphically. So my idea is to extend the back-end with graphical properties by wrapping it :

// Front-end
struct Drawable
{
  uint x, y;
};

class Visitor;
template <class T> struct GNode : public Drawable
{
  T* wrapped;
  template <class V> void accept(V& v); // v.visit(*this);
}

There is a problem now to create a visitor printing the binary tree:

struct Visitor
{
    void visit(GNode<Node>& n)
    {
      // print the label and a circle around it: ok.

      if (n.wrapped.l) // l is a Node, not a GNode, I can't use the visitor on it
        // Problem: how to call this visitor on the node's left child?

      // the same with n.wrapped.r
    };
};

As explained in comments, the back-end does not use my extended class.

Writing GNode "is-a" Node is not a solution neither since I would have to put the accept() method in the Node class as virtual and override it in GNode but I can't modify the back-end. Then, someone could say too that there is no need to declare accept() in the back-end, downcasting Node* to GNode* would work. Yes it works, but it downcasts...

In my case, I have ~10 kinds of nodes (it is a graph), so I am looking for something elegant, flexible, with as few lines of code as possible (hence the wrapper template idea) :)

Thank you very much.

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4 Answers 4

To absolutely disassociate code is impossible. They have to talk. If you really want to enforce decoupling to the maximal extent, some sort of IPC/RPC mechanism should be used and have two different programs.

That said -- I don't like visitor patterns.

You have a Graphical object, which is linked against a Behaving object. Maybe there are rules between behavior and the graphics, e.g., boundaries can't overlap.

You can do your entity relationship whatevers between the Graphicals and the Behaves, that's a biz logic question...

You will need some thungus that holds your drawing context (img, screen, buffer).

class DrawingThungus { 
  void queue_for_render(Graphical*);
  void render();
};

Your Graphical will have either an inheritance or a composition relationship with behaves. At any rate, they will have the interface needed to do Drawing.

//abstract base class class Graphical  {   
  get_x();  
  get_y();  
  get_icon(); 
  get_whatever(); 
};

If you are finding that your Render is becoming case-based depending on the kind of Graphical, I suggest pushing the cases over to the Graphical, and refactoring to have a get_primitives_list(), wherein the needed primitives are returned for Graphical to return (I am presuming that at some level, you have core primitives, lines, circles, arcs, labels, etc).

I have always found that OO analysis lends itself to wasting mental energy and should be done only enough for the task at hand. YAGNI is a tremendous principle.

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This solution is too adapted to the GUI case. I really would like a generic way to extend the back-end structure. But +1 since it would work :) –  Julio Guerra Apr 13 '11 at 0:24
    
@Julio: You have to understand, true genericity is not realistic. Coupling must happen. Take a look at the <algorithm> design in the C++ STL. Typically the containers they operate on must satisfy certain requirements. They are "generic", but they do have a coupling. Stepanov's Elements of Programming does a rather good presentation of these. –  Paul Nathan Apr 13 '11 at 15:34
    
Yes, I undertand. And I had to modify the back-end to resolve my problem. But I think it is a common question when you develop for example a library: you don't know how it will be be used and you really need to abstract it to make it as flexible as possible. –  Julio Guerra Apr 13 '11 at 19:12
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If your wrapper class (GNode) didn't have to maintain any state across visits (i.e., it only had one field - the wrapped Node object), you could use a pointer or a reference to the wrapped object instead of a copy, and then you would be able to wrap any node at runtime.

But even if you do maintain state (the x,y coordinates), don't you really just infer it from the wrapped object? In that case, wouldn't it be better to separate your visited class from the inferred data? For instance, consider this implementation:

// This is an adapter pattern, so you might want to call it VisitorAdapter if you
// like naming classes after patterns.
template typename<T>
class VisitorAcceptor
{
private:
    T& wrapped;
public:
    VisitorAcceptor(T& obj)
    {
        wrapped = obj;
    }

    template <typename VisitorT>
    void accept(VisitorT& v)
    {
        v.visit(wrapped);
    }
};

struct GNode
{
    uint x, y;
    shared_ptr<GNode> l,r; // use your favourite smart pointer here

    template <typename VisitorT>
    void accept(VisitorT& v)
}

// You don't have to call a visitor implementation 'Visitor'. It's better to name
// it according to its function, which is, I guess, calculating X,Y coordinates.
{
    shared_ptr<GNode> visit(Node& n)
    {
        shared_ptr<GNode> gnode = new GNode;
        // calculate x,y
        gnode->x = ...
        gnode->y = ...

        if (n.l)
            gnode->l = VisitorAdapter(n.r).accept(*this);
        if (n.r)
            gnode->r = VisitorAdapter(n.l).accept(*this);
    };
};

Now you can have a different visitor for drawing:

struct GNodeDrawer
{
    void visit(GNode& gnode)
    {
        // print the label and a circle around it: ok.

        if (n.r)
            visit(n.l);
        if (n.r)
            visit(n.r);
    };
};

Of course, if you don't need all the extensibility the visitor pattern offers, you can throw it away altogether and just walk the the tree recursively with XYCalculator.visit calling itself.

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Thanks for your answer, but you did not get my problem :) x,y was just an example of user-defined variables to "plug" in the back-end structure. –  Julio Guerra Apr 12 '11 at 23:04
    
@Julio Guerra: And do you want their state to be kept as long as the backend object is alive? In that case you should have some way to map between the backend and its extender object. One (classic) way is to actually have the extension class (GNode) derive from the backend class (Node). –  Boaz Yaniv Apr 12 '11 at 23:10
    
Yes, this is the solution I have found. But I am asking here hoping something else :) This is a decorator-like design pattern: keep the sasme interface but add new features. –  Julio Guerra Apr 12 '11 at 23:32
    
@Julio Guerra: The problem is that you want to be able to go from Node to GNode, and that require some infrastructure. One way is having GNode inherit from Decoratable, which would make it have a pointer to its decorator (or a vector/map of pointers if you want more than one). Then Decorators will be able to register with the Node and you would be able to retrieve the decorators having just the Node. A second option, if you don't want to modify Node at all (or you don't have access to it), is to maintain a lookup table, which will map each Node to its GNode decorator. –  Boaz Yaniv Apr 13 '11 at 4:25
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Personally, I would make a drawing class with overloaded functions (one for each node type) rather than trying to hook into the existing structure with some sort of complicated inheritance solution.

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a drawing method implies additional data (like the position, the shape, etc), so it needs at least a front-end structure representing the back-end... We arrive on the same problem which is : we need to add front-end functionalities to the back-end. –  Julio Guerra Apr 12 '11 at 14:55
    
how do you decide on those positions, shapes etc. ? Can you not just do that on the fly based on the node type and the position in the tree during traversal? –  Jon Cage Apr 12 '11 at 15:20
    
this is user defined, not static. –  Julio Guerra Apr 12 '11 at 15:40
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I finally found an "elegant" solution with the decorator design pattern. This pattern is used to extend an object without changing its interface.

GNode decorates/extends Node:

template <class T> struct GNode : public T, public Drawable
{
  virtual void accept(Visitor& v); // override Node::accept()
}

As you can see, it requires a little change in the back-end structure:

struct Node
{
  Label label;
  Node* r, l;
  virtual void accept(Visitor& v);
};

That's it ! GNode is-a Node. We can now create a binary tree of GNodes and visit it thanks to the virtual method accept() in the back-end structure.

In the case when we absolutely follow my question, i.e. we can't modify the back-end and it doesn't have the virtual entry point presented above, we can add features to GNode mapping the Node it wraps to itself. So that a visitor visiting GNodes (that can only have access to its sons) can find the GNodes of its sons. Yes, this is the virtual keyword job with the above solution! But we never know if someone would be in this case for real.

As a conclusion to all this: the way you express a problem always influences the way to resolve it.

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