Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have read quite a few blog posts and answers on SO pointing to Singleton being a bad design. Previously I implemented a singleton CameraControl class. This class controls a camera which is connected to the system. Under the following knowledge:

  • Under no circumstance will there be more than one camera (the camera API provided by the camera maker control all cameras).
  • Using the API of the camera maker in multiple places at the same time have caused problems in the past (e.g. one thread trying to grab an image, the other thread trying to set the shutter speed).
  • My class only provides several extra methods to display the image captured in a UI. Forward the image to a face detector, ... (i.e. it is not memory intensive).

Is my choice of making this class a singleton class a bad decision?

share|improve this question
    
who said that using the Singleton pattern is a bad design decision? There's a time for everything. –  hunter Apr 12 '11 at 14:48
    
@hunter: Me. If you only need one, just create one. Singletons are a bad design. –  John Dibling Apr 12 '11 at 14:50
    
Is there a reason why you are revisiting this project? Is something not working, are you experiencing some sort of bottleneck? Else i'd just leave it alone. For future projects i'd avoid Singletons. Nobody created a singleton for cout and still there is only one instance. Synchronization should be done with mutexes (and others) since singleton does not help you in that regard. –  RedX Apr 12 '11 at 14:55
    
@RedX I would like to learn whether the decision I made was bad. The code is working and I am not revisiting it in the near future. –  Dat Chu Apr 12 '11 at 14:59
    
@Dibling I'm not saying that OP should use this pattern in this case, just that there are times when the pattern makes sense. –  hunter Apr 12 '11 at 15:44
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can read anything, sooner or later. Regardless of what the some people say, there's no fundamental reason against using a singleton in the appropriate cases_. In your case, I have serious doubts, at least the way you describe it. Regardless of the API of the camera maker (which is probably in C), your client code will want to treat each individual camera as a separate object, and there's nothing inherantly unique about cameras.

Where a singleton probably is appropriate here is if the API of the camera maker is in C, and you decide to provide a lightweight C++ wrapper for it, to be used (exclusively) by your Camera classes. Such light weight wrappers are one legitimate use of singletons---there's no way in the world you can have several instances of the library in your code. (Usually, however, it's easier to have the Camera class address the API directly, and skip the intermediate wrapper.)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Singletons are considered a smell because:

  • They are the moral equivalent of global variables, and thus their use hides dependencies in code rather than revealing them through interfaces.

  • They promote tight coupling because your code depends on a specific instance of a specific type. What if you wanted your UI to operate against a different camera manager some day?

  • They make unit testing difficult because they carry state with them for the entire lifetime of the program. When state is carried across from test to test, it can make tests state-dependent, which is a very big smell.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for actually giving reasons why singletons can cause problems. –  Adam Bowen Apr 12 '11 at 15:01
    
There are many global functions that operator on a global resource, like memory, or files, or anything in the OS. By the same argument you'd be completely against global functions. A singleton can also be designed to be testable -- it need not be a singleton in the test framework. Note: I agree singletons should be avoided, but there are legitimate use cases for them where another option would be wrong. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Apr 12 '11 at 15:05
add comment

Is my choice of making this class a singleton class a bad decision?

Yes.

  • Under no circumstance will there be more than one camera (the camera API provided by the camera maker control all cameras).

That doesn't make it necessary to access the camera via a Singleton class.

  • Using the API of the camera maker in multiple places at the same time have caused problems in the past (e.g. one thread trying to grab an image, the other thread trying to set the shutter speed).

Using a Singleton class will not buy you anything that saves you from those problem that you cannot also do in a non-Singleton class.

  • My class only provides several extra methods to display the image captured in a UI. Forward the image to a face detector, ... (i.e. it is not memory intensive).

Then there's no need to create a God-like Singleton class.

Furthermore, those little nifty helper functionalities you added to the Singleton class and their interactions with other pieces of code cannot easily be unit tested when residing in a singleton class with global state that cannot properly be set up and torn down between tests.

By proper use of dependency injection in the application composition root, the concrete object lifetime can be managed as if it was a singleton, but the individual clients of that object doesn't need to know that.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I personally think it is reasonable to use Singletons when appropriate. There certainly may be overuse of them in general, but in my opinion they are useful for manager classes controlling hardware resources, which is what you are doing.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes and No

No because the problems you see about concurrency are problems you can't "safely" avoid while playing with threads. Sooner or later, bad synchronization mechanisms will come back at you and break your lovely code. You WILL need mutexes and semaphores and such to guard ressources.

Yes, because the singleton is a bad pattern to involve with threads. Check this page about singletons, you will see some pitfalls associated with it. Basically, you're asking for trouble.

Regarding the general "Singletons are evil", it is because it makes it much harder to figure out how it works, they are the OOP version of global variables. Suppose that you have a singleton somewhere, that gets modified in 15 places, how do you track it all? If you had a "real" object, you'd be able to see how it is passed around in parameters and such. The singleton breaks the concept of scope and is easy to transform into a mess.

share|improve this answer
1  
OOP has a new operator which works on a single global heap. This is a singleton pattern. Arguing completely against singletons is the same as saying new is evil. Most things can, and should, be done without singletons, but they are far from evil and have they have very valid use cases. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Apr 12 '11 at 15:08
add comment

Singleton and Monostate patterns are both useful in this regard. Your primary consideration (regarding your second point) is to prevent multiple accesses, and neither Singleton nor Monostate prevent this.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes, making it a Singleton is a bad design. If you only need one Camera object, just make one.

If you need to ensure that a camera object is used in a non-reentrant way, than that is a responsibility not of the Camera object, but of your threading model. It's a seperate job.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.