Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have over 300 000 rows, I would like to return total number of the records even if I pick only 20/50/100 records using TOP * statement.

Is it possible to filter select like

select top 50 * from table where rule1=rule1 and rule=rule2

Let's say that total number of records if database is 300 000 and select above would return 4 000 records. But physically it will return only 50 records, I need to know how manu is there in database using this where statement (it would return 4000).

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Where do you want the 4000? –  JNK Apr 12 '11 at 14:57
    
Of course you want to specify fields and never use select *. –  HLGEM Apr 12 '11 at 15:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are a lot of simple answers to this question, as other posters have pointed out. There is also a lot of subtlety depending on your scenario. There is a fairly in depth discussion of the issue @ Efficient way of getting @@rowcount from a query using row_number

share|improve this answer
select top 50 *, count(*) over()
from table
where rule1=rule1 and rule=rule2
share|improve this answer
SELECT TOP 50 
  * 
FROM TableName t1
INNER JOIN (SELECT 
              COUNT(*) AS CountOfRecords 
            FROM TableName) t2 on 1=1
share|improve this answer

You could do:

select top 50 *, (select count(*) from table) 
from table 
where rule1=rule1 and rule=rule2

This will give you the total number of rows as an extra column against each row returned by the main query. Not sure of the performance implications on this though...

Wasn't clear from your question if you need the count to be based on the filtered number of rows or not, but if so:

select top 50 *, (select count(*) from table where rule1=rule1 and rule=rule2) 
from table 
where rule1=rule1 and rule=rule2
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.