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How to get output like in git diff --color-words, but outside Git?

Closest thing is wdiff -t, but it underlines/inverts things instead of using green/red colours and does not allow specifying my whitespace regex.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 48 down vote accepted

git diff --color-words --no-index

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3  
From the manpage: "If exactly two paths are given and at least one points outside the current repository, git diff will compare the two files / directories. This behavior can be forced by --no-index." (A lot of times you don't even need --no-index.) –  Jefromi Apr 12 '11 at 15:59
    
At least in my git 1.9.3, the order should be git diff --no-index --color-words –  PhML May 29 at 13:16
    
In my git v1.9.3 order of --no-index and --color-words does not matter... (Actually I can't find a case now where it fails without --no-index at all). –  Vi. May 29 at 17:32

According to a comment from Jefromi you can just use

git diff --color-words file1 file2

outside of git repositories too.

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git diff didn't work on two arbit files as mentioned above. (git version 1.7.4). Although,git diff --color-words --no-index <file1> <file2> works, correct approach would be to use wdiff, which is intended for that purpose (gnu.org/software/wdiff) –  Manu Dec 27 '12 at 5:56
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@Manu No, git diff is intended for this purpose. wdiff is just a hack. Read your link sometime. –  Zenexer Sep 17 '13 at 10:15

you can say git diff --color=always --color-words, which will give you the color escape codes in the output. you are going to have some shell to interpret the color codes though …

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The question was about using it outside Git repository. Also it misses some things when --color-words=always instead of just --color-words. –  Vi. Apr 12 '11 at 15:12
    
@vi: sorry, you only said »outside git«, it did not mention a repository anywhere. i thought it was about having the color in other applications beside git (when e.g. piped) – which is also »outside git«, in the sense of »not inside the default git toolchain/tool collection« –  knittl Apr 12 '11 at 16:09

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