Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
a = 1
def bla x
 x = x + 1
end

bla a # =>2 when I use bla to add 1, it return 2

a # => 1 but it get back to the original value

a = [1] 

but Array

def bla x
 x << 1
end

bla a # => [1,1]

a # =>[1,1] stay in the new value 

Could Anybody tell me why it is?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is a difference between mutable and immutable objects.

  • Numerical is immutable; in other words, if you had the object 1, you cannot change its value to 2. 1 and 2 will always be different objects, having different object ids. What 1+1 is doing is returning back a newly created 2, that is a different object from 1.

  • Array, Hash, String are mutable; in other words, if you had the object [], you can change it to [1] retaining its identity, and that is what your code does. Even though the value is now different, it is the same object as [] before.

But in your case, you are comparing Fixnum#+ and Array#<< and claiming they are different. That is not strange. They are different methods, why do you expect them to be the same? In fact, as mu points out, if you do a+[1], that does not change a. It does what is comparable to Fixnum#+: create a new object and return it.

What your question should be really asking is: why is there no counterpart Numerical#<< that behaves like Array#<<? The mutable vs. immutable difference above is the answer to it.

share|improve this answer
    
Good Explanation Thanks\ –  mko Apr 13 '11 at 7:25
add comment

This is because calling the << method will edit the value at the reference to the array.

If you didn't want this to happen, you could do:

def bla x
  x + [1]
end

This works by concatenating the array, x with the array [1], returning a new array from this operation.

or:

ruby-1.9.2-p136 :007 > bla a.dup
 => [1, 1] 
ruby-1.9.2-p136 :008 > a
 => [1] 

This will use Object#dup, which will do a shallow copy.

If you wanted a deep copy, you can use Object#clone.

share|improve this answer
    
Although I'm not a ruby expert, I doubt this is accurate. In about every other language, everything is a reference and those references are passed by value. The only difference is that some object can be modified in-place. –  delnan Apr 12 '11 at 15:03
add comment

This version of your integer bla:

def bla x
  x += 1
end
a = 1
bla a

is closer to your array one. But, even this one won't change a because Fixnum instances are immutable; if Fixnum instances weren't immutable you'd have people changing the value of 1 and that would just create a big mess.

This version of your array bla:

def bla x
  x + [1]
end
a = [1]
bla a

is closer to your integer one. This array-bla will leave a unmodified.

Your array-bla changes a because x << 1 is the same as x.push(1) and the push method modifies the array. The x that your array-bla see is a reference that points to the same object that a does.

share|improve this answer
add comment

'<<' operator always append value to existing variable(by reference) but others does not.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.