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I have a Microsoft SQL stored procedure whose column name I want to set via a variable that is passed into it:

CREATE PROCEDURE [My_Procedure]
   @myDynamicColumn varchar(50)
AS BEGIN
   SELECT 'value' AS @myDynamicColumn
END

This does not work ("Incorrect syntax"). If I wrap the column name with [ ]:

SELECT 'value' AS [@myDynamicColumn]

The column name literally outputs as '@myDynamicColumn' instead of the actual value. Is there any way to do this? I've looked into dynamic SQL articles but nothing is quite what I'm asking for.

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1  
Why? This isn't how SQL should be used –  gbn Apr 12 '11 at 15:51
    
@gbn: right on. @dotNewkow: Im sure this is just a contrived example to illustrate your issue, but gbn is correct: this is complex because its wrong. If you need to alias a return from the stored procedure then just do the aliasing in the calling code, where you obviously already know the value of @myDynamicColumn. If you post more details about your problem perhaps we can offer more than dynamic sql. –  Nathan Skerl Apr 12 '11 at 16:01
    
Good question. Yes, I understand the dangers of dynamic SQL. @Nathan Skerl, you're correct, normally you'd want to set this via the calling code. However, I'm running this query as a data connection in Excel for reporting purposes. The Client wants 4 reports with relatively the same data but with different column names, so I made a stored proc for reusability & to follow the DRY principle. If this was a view, I could do: "SELECT [column] AS [My Dynamic column name] FROM [My View]" but since it's a stored proc I can only do "EXEC My_Procedure 'My Column Name'". –  dotNetkow Apr 12 '11 at 16:10
    
DRY would be to alias this in the client and keep the SQL contract identical. It isn't a SQL problem. DRY would also mean using the same name anyway. Having 4 names for one attribute is confusing... –  gbn Apr 12 '11 at 16:13
1  
How about changing the procedure to take in @ReportId and then within procedure emulate what you would do in view... ie, IF @ReportId = 1 then select 'value' as [MyDynamicColumn] else if @ReportId = 2 ... At least you dont have to take on the baggage of dynamic sql. For a small number of reports/column headers I would go this route. –  Nathan Skerl Apr 12 '11 at 16:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 22 down vote accepted
EXEC ('SELECT ''value'' AS ' + @myDynamicColumn)
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Thanks, you answered 45 seconds after the other guy, so have an upvote! –  dotNetkow Apr 12 '11 at 16:16
    
@dotNetkow: Actually, I was 9 seconds ahead of "the other guy", 15:49:30 vs. 15:49:39. –  Joe Stefanelli Apr 12 '11 at 16:21
15  
Always a bridesmaid, never a bride. –  Josh Apr 13 '11 at 16:37

You could build your query into a string and use exec

CREATE PROCEDURE [My_Procedure]
   @myDynamicColumn varchar(50)
AS BEGIN
   EXEC('SELECT ''value'' AS ' + @myDynamicColumn)
END
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protected by Robert Harvey Apr 12 '11 at 16:46

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