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When playing around with multithreading, I could observe some unexpected but serious performance issues related to AtomicLong (and classes using it, such as java.util.Random), for which I currently have no explanation. However, I created a minimalistic example, which basically consists of two classes: a class "Container", which keeps a reference to a volatile variable, and a class "DemoThread", which operates on an instance of "Container" during thread execution. Note that the references to "Container" and the volatile long are private, and never shared between threads (I know that there's no need to use volatile here, it's just for demonstration purposes) - thus, multiple instances of "DemoThread" should run perfectly parallel on a multiprocessor machine, but for some reason, they do not (Complete example is at the bottom of this post).

private static class Container  {

    private volatile long value;

    public long getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    public final void set(long newValue) {
        value = newValue;
    }
}

private static class DemoThread extends Thread {

    private Container variable;

    public void prepare() {
        this.variable = new Container();
    }

    public void run() {
        for(int j = 0; j < 10000000; j++) {
            variable.set(variable.getValue() + System.nanoTime());
        }
    }
}

During my test, I repeatedly create 4 DemoThreads, which are then started and joined. The only difference in each loop is the time when "prepare()" gets called (which is obviously required for the thread to run, as it otherwise would result in a NullPointerException):

DemoThread[] threads = new DemoThread[numberOfThreads];
    for(int j = 0; j < 100; j++) {
        boolean prepareAfterConstructor = j % 2 == 0;
        for(int i = 0; i < threads.length; i++) {
            threads[i] = new DemoThread();
            if(prepareAfterConstructor) threads[i].prepare();
        }

        for(int i = 0; i < threads.length; i++) {
            if(!prepareAfterConstructor) threads[i].prepare();
            threads[i].start();
        }
        joinThreads(threads);
    }

For some reason, if prepare() is executed immediately before starting the thread, it will take twice as more time to finish, and even without the "volatile" keyword, the performance differences were significant, at least on two of the machines and OS'es I tested the code. Here's a short summary:


Mac OS Summary:

Java Version: 1.6.0_24
Java Class Version: 50.0
VM Vendor: Sun Microsystems Inc.
VM Version: 19.1-b02-334
VM Name: Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM
OS Name: Mac OS X
OS Arch: x86_64
OS Version: 10.6.5
Processors/Cores: 8

With volatile keyword:
Final results:
31979 ms. when prepare() was called after instantiation.
96482 ms. when prepare() was called before execution.

Without volatile keyword:
Final results:
26009 ms. when prepare() was called after instantiation.
35196 ms. when prepare() was called before execution.


Windows Summary:

Java Version: 1.6.0_24
Java Class Version: 50.0
VM Vendor: Sun Microsystems Inc.
VM Version: 19.1-b02
VM Name: Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM
OS Name: Windows 7
OS Arch: amd64
OS Version: 6.1
Processors/Cores: 4

With volatile keyword:
Final results:
18120 ms. when prepare() was called after instantiation.
36089 ms. when prepare() was called before execution.

Without volatile keyword:
Final results:
10115 ms. when prepare() was called after instantiation.
10039 ms. when prepare() was called before execution.


Linux Summary:

Java Version: 1.6.0_20
Java Class Version: 50.0
VM Vendor: Sun Microsystems Inc.
VM Version: 19.0-b09
VM Name: OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM
OS Name: Linux
OS Arch: amd64
OS Version: 2.6.32-28-generic
Processors/Cores: 4

With volatile keyword:
Final results:
45848 ms. when prepare() was called after instantiation.
110754 ms. when prepare() was called before execution.

Without volatile keyword:
Final results:
37862 ms. when prepare() was called after instantiation.
39357 ms. when prepare() was called before execution.


Mac OS Details (volatile):

Test 1, 4 threads, setting variable in creation loop
Thread-2 completed after 653 ms.
Thread-3 completed after 653 ms.
Thread-4 completed after 653 ms.
Thread-5 completed after 653 ms.
Overall time: 654 ms.

Test 2, 4 threads, setting variable in start loop
Thread-7 completed after 1588 ms.
Thread-6 completed after 1589 ms.
Thread-8 completed after 1593 ms.
Thread-9 completed after 1593 ms.
Overall time: 1594 ms.

Test 3, 4 threads, setting variable in creation loop
Thread-10 completed after 648 ms.
Thread-12 completed after 648 ms.
Thread-13 completed after 648 ms.
Thread-11 completed after 648 ms.
Overall time: 648 ms.

Test 4, 4 threads, setting variable in start loop
Thread-17 completed after 1353 ms.
Thread-16 completed after 1957 ms.
Thread-14 completed after 2170 ms.
Thread-15 completed after 2169 ms.
Overall time: 2172 ms.

(and so on, sometimes one or two of the threads in the 'slow' loop finish as expected, but most times they don't).

The given example looks theoretically, as it is of no use, and 'volatile' is not needed here - however, if you'd use a 'java.util.Random'-Instance instead of the 'Container'-Class and call, for instance, nextInt() multiple times, the same effects will occur: The thread will be executed fast if you create the object in the Thread's constructor, but slow if you create it within the run()-method. I believe that the performance issues described in Java Random Slowdowns on Mac OS more than a year ago are related to this effect, but I have no idea why it is as it is - besides that I'm sure that it shouldn't be like that, as it would mean that it's always dangerous to create a new object within the run-method of a thread, unless you know that no volatile variables will get involved within the object graph. Profiling doesn't help, as the problem disappears in this case (same observation as in Java Random Slowdowns on Mac OS cont'd), and it also does not happen on a single-core-PC - so I'd guess that it's kind of a thread synchronization problem... however, the strange thing is that there's actually nothing to synchronize, as all variables are thread-local.

Really looking forward for any hints - and just in case you want to confirm or falsify the problem, see the test case below.

Thanks,

Stephan

public class UnexpectedPerformanceIssue {

private static class Container  {

    // Remove the volatile keyword, and the problem disappears (on windows)
    // or gets smaller (on mac os)
    private volatile long value;

    public long getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    public final void set(long newValue) {
        value = newValue;
    }
}

private static class DemoThread extends Thread {

    private Container variable;

    public void prepare() {
        this.variable = new Container();
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        for(int j = 0; j < 10000000; j++) {
            variable.set(variable.getValue() + System.nanoTime());
        }
        long end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println(this.getName() + " completed after "
                +  ((end - start)/1000000) + " ms.");
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println("Java Version: " + System.getProperty("java.version"));
    System.out.println("Java Class Version: " + System.getProperty("java.class.version"));

    System.out.println("VM Vendor: " + System.getProperty("java.vm.specification.vendor"));
    System.out.println("VM Version: " + System.getProperty("java.vm.version"));
    System.out.println("VM Name: " + System.getProperty("java.vm.name"));

    System.out.println("OS Name: " + System.getProperty("os.name"));
    System.out.println("OS Arch: " + System.getProperty("os.arch"));
    System.out.println("OS Version: " + System.getProperty("os.version"));
    System.out.println("Processors/Cores: " + Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors());

    System.out.println();
    int numberOfThreads = 4;

    System.out.println("\nReference Test (single thread):");
    DemoThread t = new DemoThread();
    t.prepare();
    t.run();

    DemoThread[] threads = new DemoThread[numberOfThreads];
    long createTime = 0, startTime = 0;
    for(int j = 0; j < 100; j++) {
        boolean prepareAfterConstructor = j % 2 == 0;
        long overallStart = System.nanoTime();
        if(prepareAfterConstructor) {
            System.out.println("\nTest " + (j+1) + ", " + numberOfThreads + " threads, setting variable in creation loop");             
        } else {
            System.out.println("\nTest " + (j+1) + ", " + numberOfThreads + " threads, setting variable in start loop");
        }

        for(int i = 0; i < threads.length; i++) {
            threads[i] = new DemoThread();
            // Either call DemoThread.prepare() here (in odd loops)...
            if(prepareAfterConstructor) threads[i].prepare();
        }

        for(int i = 0; i < threads.length; i++) {
            // or here (in even loops). Should make no difference, but does!
            if(!prepareAfterConstructor) threads[i].prepare();
            threads[i].start();
        }
        joinThreads(threads);
        long overallEnd = System.nanoTime();
        long overallTime = (overallEnd - overallStart);
        if(prepareAfterConstructor) {
            createTime += overallTime;
        } else {
            startTime += overallTime;
        }
        System.out.println("Overall time: " + (overallTime)/1000000 + " ms.");
    }
    System.out.println("Final results:");
    System.out.println(createTime/1000000 + " ms. when prepare() was called after instantiation.");
    System.out.println(startTime/1000000 + " ms. when prepare() was called before execution.");
}

private static void joinThreads(Thread[] threads) {
    for(int i = 0; i < threads.length; i++) {
        try {
            threads[i].join();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

}

share|improve this question
    
i wouldn't include your loop println in the timings. –  jtahlborn Apr 12 '11 at 17:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It's likely that two volatile variables a and b are too close to each other, they fall in the same cache line; although CPU A only reads/writes variable a, and CPU B only reads/writes variable b, they are still coupled to each other through the same cache line. Such problems are called false sharing.

In your example, we have two allocation schemes:

new Thread                               new Thread
new Container               vs           new Thread
new Thread                               ....
new Container                            new Container
....                                     new Container

In the first scheme, it's very unlikely that two volatile variables are close to each other. In the 2nd scheme, it's almost certainly the case.

CPU caches don't work with individual words; instead, they deal with cache lines. A cache line is a continuous chunk of memory, say 64 neighboring bytes. Usually this is nice - if a CPU accessed a cell, it's very likely that it will access the neighboring cells too. Except in your example, that assumption is not only invalid, but detrimental.

Suppose a and b fall in the same cache line L. When CPU A updates a, it notifies other CPUs that L is dirty. Since B caches L too, because it's working on b, B must drop its cached L. So next time B needs to read b, it must reload L, which is costly.

If B must access main memory to reload, that is extremely costly, it's usually 100X slower.

Fortunately, A and B can communicate directly about the new values without going through main memory. Nevertheless it takes extra time.

To verify this theory, you can stuff extra 128 bytes in Container, so that two volatile variable of two Container will not fall in the same cache line; then you should observe that the two schemes take about the same time to execute.

Lession learned: usually CPUs assume that adjecent variables are related. If we want independent variables, we better place them far away from each other.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This does not only sound logical, adding some extra bytes to Container also resulted in the effect you predicted. Indeed learned a lesson today... –  sschwieb Apr 13 '11 at 10:31

Well, you're writing to a volatile variable, so I suspect that's forcing a memory barrier - undoing some optimization which can otherwise be achieved. The JVM doesn't know that that particular field isn't going to be observed on another thread.

EDIT: As noted, there are problems with the benchmark itself, such as printing while the timer is running. Also, it's usually a good idea to "warm up" the JIT before starting timing - otherwise you're measuring time which wouldn't be significant in a normal long-running process.

share|improve this answer
    
Could the smaller but still perceivable difference in the non-volatile cases have something to do with threads[i] having just been assigned and its reference and data being in the CPU cache, making for faster access when calling prepare() on it right away? If it's done in the second loop, the entries may have already expired from the cache. Same reason why the loop order for a two-dimensional array can have a big impact despite having the same end result: blocks of memory being cached. Just wondering. –  G_H Apr 12 '11 at 17:25
    
@G_H: I don't know, to be honest. The details of what happens not only at the level of the JITted code, but also below that, on the CPU itself, are somewhat beyond me :( –  Jon Skeet Apr 12 '11 at 17:26
    
Well, I once tried it. int[][] test = new int[10000][10000] or a more suitable dimension. Then visit each element through two nested loops and do something with it. Taking each test[i] and then visiting each test[i][j] was a lot faster than the other way around. The reason being that [i][j] entries are probably in contiguous blocks of memory that are cached in batch, whereas [i] entries might be further apart. Actually, I'm not making much sense without full code extracts but I do remember gasping at factor 10 speed differences. –  G_H Apr 12 '11 at 17:34
    
@G_H: Yes, cache misses are expensive :) –  Jon Skeet Apr 12 '11 at 17:41

I am not an expert in the internals of Java, but I read your question and find it fascinating. If I had to guess, I think what you have discovered:

  1. Does NOT have anything to do with the instantiation of the volitale property. However, from your data, where the property gets instantiated affects how expensive it is to read/write to it.

  2. Does have to do with finding the reference of the volitale property at runtime. That is, I would be interested to see how the delay grows with more threads that loop more often. Is the number of calls to the volitale property what is causing the delay, or the addition itself, or the writing of the new value.

I would have to guess that: there is probably a JVM optimization that attempts to quickly instantiate the property, and later, if there is time, to alter the property in memory so it is easier to read/write to it. Maybe there is a (1) quick-to-create read/write queue for volitale properties, and a (2) hard-to-create but quick to call queue, and the JVM begins with (1) and later alters the volitale property to (2).

Perhaps if you prepare() right before the run() method gets called, the JVM does not have enough free cycles to optimize from (1) to (2).

The way to test this answer would be to:

prepare(), sleep(), run() and see if you get the same delay. If the sleep is the only thing that is causing for the optimization to take place, then it could mean the JVM needs cycles to optimize the volitale property

OR (a bit more risky) ...

prepare() and run() the threads, later in the middle of the loop, to either pause() or sleep() or somehow stop access to the property in a way that the JVM can attempt to move it to (2).

I'd be interested to see what you find out. Interesting question.

share|improve this answer

Well, the big difference I see is in the order in which objects are allocated. When preparing after the constructor, your Container allocations are interleaved with your Thread allocations. When preparing prior to execution, your Threads are all allocated first, then your Containers are all allocated.

I don't know a whole lot about memory issues in multi-processor environments, but if I had to guess, maybe in the second case the Container allocations are more likely to be allocated in the same memory page, and perhaps the processors are slowed down due to contention for the same memory page?

[edit] Following this line of thought, I'd be interested to see what happens if you don't try to write back to the variable, and only read from it, in the Thread's run method. I would expect the timings difference to go away.

[edit2] See irreputable's answer; he explains it much better than I could

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